Tim Boxer At JCRC Dinner
03/27/12
Jewish Week Online Columnist
Photo Galleria: 

Matthew Goldstein, chancellor of City University of New York, recalled a commencement where he introduced the speaker and told him, “Marvin, be brief because no one will remember what you say.”

Marvin got up and addressed the audience:  “When you leave here remember one thing: make money.”  He sat down and got a standing ovation.

At the Jewish Community Relations Council dinner on March 22 at the Pierre, Goldstein was also brief as he presented the Corporate Leader Award to  Stephen Siegel, chairman of Global Brokerage at CBRE.

With a heavy heart, Siegel revealed, “My wife Wendy was diagnosed with leukemia.”  He wanted to back out of the dinner but his wife told him, “You made a commitment, you go.” 

“Please pray for my Wendy,” Siegel said.

James Lebenthal, of the successful wealth management company, presented a Continuing Legacy Award to his daughter, Alexandra Lebenthal. It was quite obvious how proud he was of his amazing daughter. “She didn’t need my help to get into Princeton,” he said. “She even found her husband without me.” Alexandra is now president and CEO of Lebenthal & Co. And daddy? He’s chairman emeritus.

Michael Miller, the executive vice president of JCRC for 25 years, and Jacques Brand, co-head of investment banking coverage at Deutsche Bank, presented the Community Builders Award to brothers Arthur and Edward Coppola. The Coppolas own more than 70 shopping malls around the country, including the Queens Center Mall. “We’re the economic engine of the communities we serve,” Edward said.

Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly and wife Veronica , left, with Phyllis and Michael Miller at JCRC dinner. 

Last Update:

03/30/2012 - 10:09

Comment Guidelines

The Jewish Week feels comments create a valuable conversation and wants to feature your thoughts on our website. To make everyone feel welcome, we won't publish comments that are profane, irrelevant, promotional or make personal attacks.

Add comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.