Egyptian Mistreatment Of Jews Recalled At UN
03/19/08
Staff Writer
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A Libyan Jew described to an Egyptian official Wednesday how as a 6-year-old her teacher traumatized her and how she and other Jews were expelled after the Six-Day War in 1967. In prepared remarks before the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva, Regina Bublil Waldman recalled the first time she “experienced hate” when her math teacher posed the following math question to the class: “If you have 10 Jews and you kill five of them, how many Jews do you have left to kill?” “I came home crying,” she said. Waldman, who was to wear her grandmother’s Libyan wedding dress as she spoke, said that during the Six-Day War, “mobs took to the streets and shouted, ‘Slaughter the Jews!’” she said. “They burned my father’s warehouse. Then they came to burn down our home. A Muslim neighbor stopped them.” The Egyptian delegate to the commission was expected to be in attendance when Waldman spoke. Stan Urman, executive director of Justice for Jews from Arab Countries, said it would be the “first time a Jewish refugee from an Arab country had confronted” an Arab official. He said Waldman’s appearance before the council was arranged by UN Watch, a non-governmental organization that is accredited by the UN. In a soon to be published article, Sidney Zabludoff, an international economist who has been focusing on the issue of Jewish assets stolen by the Nazis, wrote that a resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict should include the right of return and/or compensation for both Palestinians and Jews. He said his analysis leads him to believe that 1 million Jews were displaced compared with 650,000 Palestinians displaced in the 1948 and 1967 wars. “The only way to move forward the reality of how such events have been handled in the past is to stress the clear fact that there were more Jews who fled Middle Eastern and North African countries than Palestinians who left Israel,” he wrote.

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03/07/2012 - 01:40

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