Congress Delays Iran Sanctions Bill, With AIPAC Blessing
05/25/10
JTA
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WASHINGTON (JTA) -- In a sign of closer White House-congressional coordination on Iran, Congress is delaying an Iran sanctions bill several weeks to give the Obama administration time to shepherd new sanctions through the U.N. Security Council.

The American Israel Public Affairs Committee blessed the delay, in part because an array of parallel measures are under consideration that would stiffen existing sanctions aimed at getting the Iranian regime to stand down from its suspected nuclear weapons program.

"We have always said that tough multilateral sanctions are the most effective means to persuade Iran to cease its efforts to develop a nuclear weapons capability -- a demand repeated time and again by the international community -- and we applaud the efforts of President Obama and his national security team to unite the other permanent members of the Security Council behind this urgent goal," said a joint statement by U.S. Rep. Howard Berman (D-Calif.), the chairman of the House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Committee, and U.S. Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.), the chairman of the Senate Banking Committee.

The statement predicted passage by the "latter half of June."

Both the House and Senate have passed versions of enhanced unilateral sanctions that would target third parties -- including countries, individuals and companies -- that deal with Iran's energy sector. The bills are undergoing reconciliation, and congressional leaders had said they would pass this month.

The Obama administration has lobbied hard to delay the congressional sanctions, fearing that they could alienate the major powers it has persuaded to join the Security Council's multilateral sanctions.

The enhanced Security Council sanctions, targeting Iran's banking sector and mandating inspections of Iranian ships, lack the bite of the congressional measures. However, they broaden multilateral sanctions to encompass whole sectors -- banking and shipping -- as opposed to individuals and entities. That would lay the foundations for future sanctions that could more broadly target the regime.

"AIPAC supports this decision and endorses Chairmen Dodd and Berman's firm, public commitment to get tough, comprehensive Iran sanctions legislation on the President's desk before the July 4th recess," the lobby said in a statement. "We urge President Obama to sign and implement that legislation immediately upon its arrival on his desk."

AIPAC was assuaged in part by plans to insert language in other bills that would inhibit presidential waivers on existing sanctions. Recent reports have revealed that U.S. businesses that have illicitly traded with Iran have done $107 billion in business with the U.S. government. The businesses got away with the double dealing because successive presidents have not used sanctions at their disposal since Congress passed sweeping legislation in 1996.

House appropriators announced Tuesday that they would attach language to a supplemental appropriations bill that would require contractors to certify that they are not doing business with Iran. The sanctions would still be subject to a presidential waiver, but on a case-by-case basis, and on condition of certification to Congress that the waiver was necessary for national security.

"One of the most effective things we can do to compel compliance with the Iran Sanctions Act is use the power of the purse," said Rep. Steve Israel (D-N.Y.), who worked on the legislation with fellow appropriators Reps. Steve Rothman (D-N.J.), Mark Kirk (R-Ill.) and Ben Chandler (D-Ky.) under the auspices of Rep. Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.), who chairs the foreign operations appropriations subcommittee.

Israel told JTA that he was sensitive to Defense Department concerns that some companies discovered doing business with Iran also might be providing critical aid to U.S. troops, for instance with anti-explosive device materiel.

"Then the president should tell Congress, but it shouldn't be done in the dark, it shouldn't be behind closed doors," he said.

Israel called attaching the language to the supplemental appropriations bill a "shot across the bow." He was hoping to attach it eventually to all 12 appropriations bills in Congress.

Rep. Ron Klein (D-Fla.) launched a parallel effort to attach similar language to defense authorization bills. His amendment would suspend for three years business with contractors that falsely certify that they are not doing business with Iran.

Authorization bills permit the government to carry out programs; appropriations bills fund the programs.

 

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Last Update:

05/25/2010 - 18:18

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