the new york times

Girl with the L-Line Tattoo: Jill Abramson Takes Over The New York Times

Jill Abramson, the just-annouced new editor of The New York Times, got a tattoo when she was 49.  It was of a subway token and Abramson said she got it to re-affirm her roots as a lifelong New Yorker.  And perhaps needless to say, a Jewish New Yorker.  She spoke with New York magazine last year in a prophetic profile written when she was then the No. 2 editor at the paper, under Bill Keller's one-spot.

Lars Von Trier and Holocaust Fatigue

The Cannes Film Festival's board of directors did the right thing in expelling Lars von Trier from the festival today.  The decision came only a day after Von Trier, a Danish director who was raised an atheist, though told that his father was Jewish, made outrageous comments about Hitler. 

Tony, Toni, Tone: An Intelligent Guide to the Kushner Affair

It isn't the best week for Tony Kushner. Earlier this week he was waylaid CUNY's board of trustees, after a right-wing Israel supporter who sits on the board convinced the school to rescind an honorary degree because of the playwright's criticism of Israel (first, I say with admittedly churlish pride, reported by my Jewish Week colleague, Doug Chandler). 

Maira Kalman and Jewishness in Art

This week I wrote my Culture View column on Maira Kalman's new exhibit at The Jewish Museum.  I've got a pet obsession with her work, and figured that it would have been near impossible to leave my utterly self-conscious bias behind for the sake of a more "critical" review.  So instead, I used it as an occasion to look at the same illustrations of hers I love--with all their winsomeness, humor, wit, vivacity and even occasional sadness--and simply view them in another light.

Dancing with the Stars, and Hasids!

If you were reading the Sunday Times this weekend, you saw the big Israel story about Stuxnet.  But there was another story, tucked deep in the Arts & Leisure section, that you may have missed.

How Not To Cover Hasids: Or, Why We Love Stories about Black Celebrity Jews

In the journalism trade, there is dependable genre we call the "quirky" story.  Editors love them because our readers do: they offer a churlish delight in the abnormal, the strange, the off-beat.  For the most part, they're harmless, fun throw-away stuff that lend a respite from the otherwise moribund front-page fare.

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