new york city

What Chutzpah!

Reflections on the times and life of the New Yorker who saved the city in a brashly Jewish way.

02/01/2013
Special To The Jewish Week

Many eras could reasonably compete as the defining Jewish moment of New York City: pushcarts on the Lower East Side, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, the CCNY point-shaving scandal, the Ocean Hill-Brownsville teachers’ strike, the Brill Building’s influence on the American songbook, and the garment industry’s styling of American haute couture.

Koch at a White House state dinner in 2012. Getty Images

UPDATED: Lessons From A Kind Cop


Had a cop been photographed callously walking by an ostensibly homeless man who sat barefoot on one of the coldest nights of the year, it likely would have generated as much media attention as what actually happened:  Officer Larry DePrimo stopped and bought the man a pair of boots and socks.

To Officer Larry DePrimo, a barefoot man in the cold is "unacceptable."

Ohad Naharin, and the Art of Provocation

Ohad Naharin, the Israeli choreographer, is so synonymous with his home country that I often forget he did much of his formal training in the United States.  In New York, in fact, at both the School of American Ballet and Juilliard. I get a vivid reminder of that this weekend, when Juilliard’s remarkable ensemble of student dancers performed his work “Secus,” from 2005.

A Tale of Two Cities: Jews vs. Hispanics and Blacks, New York City

New York magazine has a great chart comparing two adjacent New York City congressional districts in this week's issue.  One is District 14, which includes all of the Upper East Side, parts of Murray Hill, Long Island City, Astoria, and a few other less affluent places too.  The other is District 16, just north of the Upper East Side, and covers much of the South Bronx. The stats they line up are startling: the average income in District 14 is $79,385; in D-16 it's $23,073.

Chaos and Classicism, The Music!: A Night with Ivan Fischer and the Budapest Festival Orchestra

A classical music program that includes works by Haydn may not strike you as radical.  After all Haydn--friend of Mozart, teacher of Beethoven--virtually invented the classical symphony as we know it. When newcomers think "classical music," it is probably the sounds of Haydn they hear in their head.

Poems, by Hannah Senesh

This week I wrote a review of the Hannah Senesh exhibit at the Museum of Jewish Heritage.  A  wealthy Jewish girl from Hungary, Senesh immigrated to Palestine in 1939, when she was 17.  After a few years there, however, she felt isolated from world events: put simply, the war in Europe.  So when the British organized a Jewish brigade in Palestine to help them rescue Allied forces caught behind enemy lines, she signed on.  

Polling Place at Messianic Building Changed After Complaints by Orthodox Jewish Voters

10/26/2010

(JTA) -- A polling place at a messianic Christian center in New York was changed after Orthodox Jewish voters protested.

Jewish voters complained to the Board of Elections after the Life in Messiah evangelical group's building was announced as a polling place for four election districts from Midwood in Brooklyn, according to the New York Daily News. The voters said their strict adherence to Jewish law would not allow them to enter the building.
The group requested after the outcry that its building not be used.

Lincoln Square Halts Construction On New Shul; Project Millions More Than Planned

10/15/2010

Anyone who has walked by the construction site of the new Lincoln Square Synagogue on Amsterdam Avenue lately has surely noticed that there’s not much construction going on. This week, the prestigious Modern Orthodox shul announced on its website that construction on the three-story, 50,000-square-foot- building has indeed halted.

Recession, cost overruns have halted construction on new Lincoln Square Synagogue on Amsterdam Ave.

Power to the Pita

02/05/2010
Editorial Intern

The prospect of Greenwich Village’s best falafel enticed more than 120 hungry New Yorkers onto the cold streets late last month.

A “falafel crawl,” — which hit five kosher and non-kosher establishments in close proximity — was the latest adventure of NYC Food crawls, a group that began last October, with a dumpling crawl around Chinatown.

Mamoun’s Falafel on MacDougal Street received the most votes for taste and value on the Greenwich Village falafel crawl.
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