Millenials

Are Young Jews Actually More Connected Than Believed?

A misreading of the study’s findings has implications for Jewish community.

10/09/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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After a long wait, the American Jewish community once again has a rich, large national demographic study of American Jewish life to learn from and argue about — the recently released “Portrait of Jewish Americans” published by the Pew Research Center. Based on interviews with 3,475 respondents, the study divides its respondents throughout into “Jews by religion” (78 percent) and “Jews of no religion,” (22 percent), and presents data on the ways these two groups of American Jews are — and are not — connected to things Jewish, as well as their attitudes towards Israel, American leaders and a few political issues.

Sylvia Barack Fishman

For Health Reform To Succeed, Millenials Must Participate

08/29/2013
Online Jewish Week Columnist
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Jewish law is deeply concerned about and committed to healthcare being a matter of collective responsibility. The American Jewish community is vocal in support of healthcare reform, and and over the past few years there has been great progress in ensuring that the most vulnerable are able to get the healthcare they need. Yet the ultimate success or failure of Obamacare may be up to millenials, many of whom are relucant to participate.

Young, healthy people feel they don't need insurance - but the success of national healthcare reform depends on them. Fotolia

A Book For You, 20s and 30s Jews

Like this blog, the new anthology, Living Jewishly: A Snapshot of a Generation, is by – but not exclusively for – Jews in their 20s and 30s.

Edited by Stephanie Pervos Bregman and published by Academic Studies Press, it grapples with all the juicy stuff: dating, sex, God, food.

Some tidbits:

"Living Jewishly" is a collective literary effort by twenty and thirtysomethings. Via Facebook
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