Midrash

Abraham And The World War

10/09/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
Story Includes Video: 
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Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 6:03 p.m.
Torah: Gen. 12:1-17:27
Haftarah: Isaiah 40:-27-41:16
Havdalah: 7:02 p.m.

Sandra Rapoport

Prayer And Presence

05/22/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

The Midrash teaches that when the Israelites left Egypt, God enveloped them in “clouds of glory.” When they wished for bread, God provided manna. When they craved meat, God sent quails. Once these wishes had been granted, the people began to doubt, saying, “Is God among us, or not?” 
The point of the Midrash is that Israel could only feel God’s presence when they were receiving gifts. This is a common malady; many people pray for something and if they do not receive it assume that there is no God.

Body, Soul And Midrash

New collection of essays shows how interpretation
can be used to find new meaning in the biblical text —
and as a resource for healing.

Jewish Week Book Critic
02/08/2011

I n shuls everywhere, of all denominations, the “Mi Sheberach” prayer is said regularly, naming individuals in need of healing. The prayer itself and the way it is said may differ from one community to the next. The late Debbie Friedman, for instance, set the words to music that is widely known and sung. Some people approach the bima with “long lists of names inside their hearts,” while others have handwritten lists in their pockets, Rabbi Julie Pelc Adler, explains in an essay, “A Midrash on the Mi Sheberakh.”

Contributors to “Midrash and Medicine” include physicians, rabbis, social workers, psychologists and philosophers.

What the Bible Teaches about Social Media

Here is an interesting article by my colleague Rabbi Ruth Abusch-Magder, Ph.D., who is the Rabbi-in-Residence of Be'chol Lashon and the editor of Tzeh U'llimad:

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