Medicine

Innovation Is Not A Synonym For ‘New’

05/04/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

In late 2002, when our Joshua Venture Group (JVG) cohort was announced, the term “Jewish social entrepreneur” did not yet roll easily off the tongue. There was no “innovation ecosystem” to speak of, few incubators interested in helping us grow our ventures, and little confidence that Jewish life could or should blossom outside of existing institutional frameworks. JVG was founded to help emerging leaders change the Jewish world with their ideas.

Friend Jay Feinberg, Save A Life

05/15/2009
Staff Writer

In these days of tracking Tweets and finding Facebook friends, one organization is using the social media craze to try to save lives, through the click of a mouse.

Israeli Scientists Chasing High-Tech Breakthroughs

09/26/2008
Editorial Intern

Israeli scientists in universities across the country have been forging ahead in recent months with new innovations in medicine and technology that could lead to breakthroughs.

Professor Shimon Efrat of Tel Aviv University’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine, along with graduate students Holger Russ and Yael Bar, have developed a way to cultivate healthy human beta cells in the laboratory and implant them into diabetes patients. They are now working to convince the body to accept these cells — a move that could pave the way to a new and simpler form of diabetes treatment.

Mumps Spreads To New Communities

02/19/2010
Staff Writer

A mumps outbreak in the Orthodox community, which began last summer, has spread beyond Williamsburg and Borough Park to include scattered incidents in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, and Far Rockaway, Queens, city Health Department officials say.
 

Far Rockaway pediatrician Dr. Hylton Lightman told The Jewish Week that he has seen about 20 mumps patients, most of them men between 17 and 23, as well as four or five girls and two mothers.
 

Among his patients is a staff member at the Bnot Shulamith Elementary School in Woodmere, L.I.
 

The Health Burden Of The Survivors

Study reveals that those who went through the Holocaust are more likely to get cancer than European Jews who didn’t.

02/05/2010
Staff Writer

For Jews who escaped Europe during the Holocaust and settled in Israel, the Jewish state really was a kind of Promised Land. Yet from a health perspective, the young country couldn’t immunize them from the physical and mental burdens they carried with them.

In fact, Europeans who immigrated to Israel after the Holocaust were 2.4 times more likely to develop cancer than those who arrived before the war, according to a recent study published in Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Not Immune From Mumps

12/01/2009
Staff Writer

Stemming from an initial mumps outbreak that wreaked havoc at a Jewish camp this summer, 247 New York City residents plus 131 other state residents have since contracted the disease, which remains mostly contained among fervently Orthodox adolescent boys in pockets of New York, New Jersey and Quebec, according to official reports from the New York City and State Departments of Health.

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