Man Booker Prize

British Author Jacobson To Rewrite Shakespeare's 'Merchant Of Venice'

09/09/2013
Staff Writer
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Howard Jacobson, British author who won the 2010 Man Booker Prize for his Jewish-themed novel The Finkler Question, has been commissioned to rewrite The Merchant of Venice in prose, according to The Jewish Chronicle.

Howard Jacobson won the Man Booker Prize in 2010. Getty Images

The Agony and Ecstasy of Jewish Book Awards

After Howard Jacobson won Britain's premier literary award, the Man Booker Prize, last year, for his very Jewish novel, "The Finkler Question," I celebrated with a heavy heart.  On the one hand, it was thrilling to see such a thickly-themed Jewish book--and an extremely good one--win Britain's highest award, especially at a time when even liberals are getting a little anxious about how much casual anti-semitism passes in polite company these days. 

The Man Booker Question: "The Finkler Question"?

As a general rule, I don't cheerlead for people I've written about.  But I'll allow myself this: hats off, again, to Howard Jacobson, whose novel "The Finkler Question" was shortlisted today for the Man Booker Prize.  Jacobson, one of Britain's most respected and funniest writers, did an interview with me a couple of weeks ago.

The Man Booker Question: "The Finkler Question"?

As a general rule, I don't cheerlead for people I've written about.  But I'll allow myself this: hats off, again, to Howard Jacobson, whose novel "The Finkler Question" was shortlisted today for the Man Booker Prize.  Jacobson, one of Britain's most respected and funniest writers, did an interview with me a couple of weeks ago.

The Man Booker Prize and Howard Jacobson, the British Philip Roth

Hats off to Howard Jacobson, often dubbed "the British Philip Roth," who was long-listed yesterday for the Man Booker Prize in Fiction.  While his book, "The Finkler Question," a comic novel about three single Jewish intellectuals, has not been released in the States yet, it's already made a big splash in the UK.  It's reception is worth noting too, in light of the recent uptick in concern over British anti-Semitism.

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