LGBTQ

UJA Holds Its First LGBTQ Conference

06/26/2014
Staff Writer
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“I’ve turned gray waiting for UJA to make this conference,” said Shelly Weiss, a longtime LGBTQ activist. She was referring to UJA-Federation of New York’s first-ever conference focused on the Jewish gay, lesbian, transgender and queer community, which took place last month at the charity’s headquarters on East 59th Street.

This UJA logo reflects its enhanced focus on the LGBTQ community. Courtesy of UJA-Fed NY

At Eshel, We Are Hopeful

04/10/2014

Our friend Justin Spiro has hit upon the challenge in his piece, "LGBTQ Youth Have No Derech To Stray From." We cannot complain that young people are leaving a community if it leaves them first. 

A New ‘Mosaic’ For Westchester

Recently launched nonprofit aims to bring LGBT community into Jewish fold.

02/25/2014
Westchester Correspondent
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Diane Werner wants to be sure that no one in the Jewish LGBTQ community ever feels unwelcome in a Westchester Jewish organization. She can’t forget what one of her sons, who is gay, had said to her about his synagogue and day school experience: “I don’t see anyone like me.”

Westchester’s year-old Mosaic group aims to make the wider Jewish community welcoming of the LGBTQ community. Bina Raskin/Mosaic

My Secret, As The Father Of An LGBTQ Child -- Not What You Think!

10/11/2013
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Editor's Note: Eshel, an organization that advocates for an Orthodox community that is inclusive of LGBTQ Jews, offered us this piece in honor of National Coming Out DayEshel is launching an Orthodox Allies Roundtable.  To find out more on how to be an Orthodox ally click here.

I am a Modern Orthodox Jew, the product of a Torah u’Madda (Torah and secular) education. I am not sure what I expected to discover at this first-ever weekend “Shabbaton,” hosted by Eshel, for Orthodox Jewish parents of LGBTQ children last April. 

Tel Aviv Youth Center Shooting Was a Hate Crime

06/12/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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Nearly four years ago, on August 1, 2009, a horrific shooting at the Bar Noar LGBTQ youth center in Tel Aviv injured dozens of teens and killed 27 year old youth counselor Nir Katz and 16-year-old Liz Trubishi. The tragic event struck fear in the LGBT community and deeply shook LGBT people and straight allies worldwide.

Rabbi Ayelet S. Cohen
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