Kristallnacht

A Night Of Remembrance In Berlin

11/12/2013
Staff Writer
Story Includes Video: 
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During the Third Reich, the Brandenburg Gate, a landmark in the center of the German capital, was a symbol of Nazi supremacy, through which uniformed soldiers would march.

Germans remember Kristallnacht. Getty Images

Kristallnacht, 75 Years Later

11/06/2013
Editorial

Seventy-five years ago this weekend the world failed a test.

Throughout Germany and parts of Austria the Nazis carried out an extensive pogrom. There were attacks on Jewish individuals and sites on Nov. 9-10,1938, leaving at least 91 Jews dead, some 30,000 arrested and interned in concentration camps, and more than 1,000 synagogues and 7,000 Jewish-owned businesses destroyed.

Austrian Politician Slammed For Comparing Protests To Kristallnacht

01/31/2012

(JTA) -- The leader of an Austrian far-right political party was condemned for comparing protests by students in Vienna with the Nazi persecution of Jews during Kristallnacht.

The Anti-Defamation League on Monday slammed the comments made Jan. 27 by Austrian Freedom Party leader Heinz-Christian Strache in response to heckling from leftist and radical protesters outside the Wiener Korporations-Ball in Vienna.

Missing Yitzchak Rabin

11/18/2011
Jewish Week Online Columnist

Falling as it did this year so close to the seventy-third anniversary of Kristallnacht, when German and Austrian houses of worship literally went up in smoke and flame, I feel as if I personally haven’t paid enough attention to the sixteenth anniversary of the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin. 

 Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik is the spiritual leader of the Forest Hills Jewish Center in Queens.

Sex And Kristallnacht: The Boy Toy (And Boy Assassin) Who Started It All

For all the talk every Kristallnacht (Nov. 9-10) that we have to remember history and how it happened, there seems to be a collective willing of Jewish amnesia about what exactly happened.

We know that the Nazis unleashed a nationwide pogrom of unparalleled brutality in response to the assassination in Paris of a German official, Ernst Vom Rath, by a Jewish teenager, Herschel Grynszpan, who said he was avenging his parents who were being harassed back in Germany.

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