kosher recipe

Kosher S'mores Indoors

A pro roaster won't settle for anything less than perfection.

07/30/2013
Food & Wine Editor
Story Includes Video: 
0

S’mores, in my snobby opinion, are a delicacy. You can’t simply put marshmallows and chocolate over a graham cracker, stick them in the microwave or toaster oven, and call them s’mores.

NOM NOM NOM
Photo Galleria
Photo Galleria: 
Ah, golden goodness!
Notice the yummy gooey inside... and the powdery hands.

Summer's Favorite Fruit

Ataulfo mangoes make for a scrumptious dessert carpaccio.

06/26/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
Story Includes Video: 
0

If you’ve never eaten an Ataulfo mango, stop what you’re doing and buy one because you’ve missed something very special. There’s a reason this fruit is also called the “champagne mango.” Its sweet, incredibly luscious flesh is something to celebrate.

Photo Galleria
Photo Galleria: 
The champagne mango. Ronnie Fein

Simple. Beautiful. Kushner.

Schmoozing and snacking with Kim Kushner at her book signing.

06/06/2013
Food & Wine Editor
Story Includes Video: 
0

Kim Kushner signs copies of her cookbook at Eli's supermarket. Emma Goss
Photo Galleria
Photo Galleria: 
A pleasant garlic aroma from the pistachio pesto farfalle scented the room
Heirloom tomatoes with mint and cilantro were light and fresh

The Better Blintz

Crunchy, creamy, gooey goat cheese and zucchini blintzes.

05/09/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
Story Includes Video: 
0

The best thing I ever ate was a crepe off of a food truck in Paris. Perhaps it was because I consumed it at the fourth meal hour of 3:00 a.m., but I still dream of the soft yet slightly crunchy crepe oozing lots of gooey cheeses and fresh spinach. Once I started cooking Jewish cuisine for a living, I realized my beloved crepe was really just the French equivalent of Bubbe’s classic cheese blintzes.

How about a land flowing with cheese & cilantro sauce? Amy Kritzer
Photo Galleria
Photo Galleria: 

Crazy For Israeli Couscous

Pack some springtime flavor into fluffy Israeli couscous.

04/11/2013
Food & Wine Editor

Couscous, the grain so nice they named it twice! Oy, a corny joke, but also quite accurate when it comes to Israeli couscous. As I learned from Sam Talbot on GMC Trade Secrets, Israeli couscous is smaller than ordinary couscous and therefore less granie, and quicker to cook. What’s nice about this recipe is it packs in a lot of great spices and flavors thanks to the dried coconut, pine nuts, onion, lemon and garlic. A perfect dish to welcome springtime.

Israeli couscous is a fresh, satisfying side dish. Fotolia

Shakshuka, Sabra-Style

Taglit-Birthright's online cookbook globalizes Israeli cooking.

04/05/2013
Food & Wine Editor

After returning from a trip to Israel, it's difficult to find falafel in the United States that lives up to the deliciousness of the one you had on Ben Yehudah, or anywhere in Israel for that matter. But that's all about to change.

Pita and hummus recipes featured in the cookbook.

A Homerun Of A Snack

Have an easy time making this salty street food in your own kitchen.

03/01/2013
Food & Wine Editor

There’s nothing I like more than biting into a soft, warm pretzel, (smothered in mustard) but rarely can I find such a treat outside of a ballpark or street vendor. Fortunately, Daphna Rabinovitch at The Kosher Scoop has an easy, quick and fun way to prepare this scrumptious snack at home. 

Soft pretzels fresh from the oven. Photo via Pickycook.com

Hearty Lentil Soup

Fill up and stay warm with this tasty dish.

03/08/2012
Online Jewish Week Columnist

If you (and your teeth) survived the onslaught of sugar that is the holiday of Purim, congratulations! In an effort to stay away from sweets and embrace wholesome, hearty foods, I present one of the most humble of all foods: The lentil. A seemingly quiet, unassuming legume, lentils are super cheap, packed with protein, fiber and vitamins. Oh, and they're tasty.

Hearty Lentil Soup. Photo by Amy Spiro
Syndicate content