Judaism

Who Gets Religious Custody in an Interfaith Divorce?

04/20/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

The case of little Ela Reyes raises many thorny issues about church/state entanglement, parenting in a multicultural world, and the challenge of religious pluralism. Ela’s parents, Rebecca Reyes (born Jewish) and her now ex-husband Joseph Reyes (raised Catholic, converted to Judaism, and now returning to the Church) found themselves in court over the issue of his right to bring Ela to church. Cook County (Illinois) Judge Renee Goldfarb ruled that Mr. Reyes has the right to do so. 

Moves on Goldstone Bar Mitzvah Spark Brouhaha

04/20/2010
JTA

CAPE TOWN, South Africa (JTA) -- Talk about shul politics.

In the interest of avoiding a disruption of his grandson’s bar mitzvah, Judge Richard Goldstone, author of the Goldstone report on the 2009 Gaza war, told JTA last week that he would not attend the family simcha next month at a Johannesburg synagogue.

But in case Goldstone has any second thoughts, a leading South African Jewish group announced it is ready to protest should he show up.

Conflict of Interest: Making Room For New Traditions

04/16/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

It must be nice to live in a world of Jewish absolutes. Denizens of the black and white Jewish world experience no discomfort. For them life is simple. Neither the extreme left nor the extreme right has any doubts. Their belief system permits no dichotomies, allows for no flexibility, and frowns on compromise. This is especially true of religion, and politics. More so when they are combined.

Can Our 15 Minutes Last?

The rewards and pitfalls of being cool in America’s eyes.

12/24/2003
Special To The Jewish Week

A favorite inside joke among American Jews has always been their disproportionate influence on American culture. Although small in absolute numbers, their contribution to cultural achievement has been indisputably vast, to the point where some American art forms would almost not have existed were it not for Jews.

Moishe House Bringing Community To Budapest Jews

Apartments for 20-somethings seen as ‘new, grass-roots model’ of Jewish engagement.

03/11/2010
JTA

Budapest — When 29-year-old Eszter Susan announced on Facebook last September that she had moved into a Moishe House, few of her friends knew what she was talking about.

Six months later the rambling, high-ceilinged apartment she shares with two other young women has become a focal point of Jewish involvement for dozens of Budapest Jews in their 20s.

There are parties at Jewish holidays, movie nights, lectures on Jewish topics, social action meetings and a Kabbalat Shabbat service followed by a potluck dinner that attracts dozens of people each Friday night.

Eszter Susan, left, Anna Balint and Zsofia Simon skype with Kevin Sherman, the director of international programming at Moishe's

Lubavitch Laptops

08/26/2009
Staff Writer

They may be in Thessaloniki or in the foothills of the Himalayas, but emissaries-to-be in the Rebbe’s Army — as befits the high tech-savvy Chabad movement — are online all the while.

Rabbi Avi Shlomo talks with a local Jew on the Greek island of Rhodes.

For German Converts, A New Home for the Soul

04/14/2009
Staff Writer

Trekking through ice-coated fields in a brutally cold Russian October, Lt. Arthur Wollschlaeger pressed on, as he and his swastika-emblazoned companions conquered the western Russian city of Orel — another victory for the unrelenting German Werhmacht infantry. He had earlier taken part in invasions of Poland, Holland and France — a World War II military career that began when he first entered the Czechoslovakian Sudetenland, in 1938.

Bernd Wollschlaeger, carrying the Torah, broke from his parents to become a Jew.

YouTube Orthodoxy

02/23/2010
Staff Writer

Allison Josephs sits in her bathroom in a green facial mask, relaxing in dark blue towel-turban and peeling cucumber slices off her eyes.

“Dear Jew in the City,” she recites. “My friend just told me that Orthodox people consider women dirty when it’s their time of the month. And that’s just so horrible — I mean, it’s a natural bodily occurrence. How could they make it into something so negative?”

Allison Josephs: Trying to “re-brand” Orthodox Judaism.
Syndicate content