the jewish week

A Mission That Is Ever More Vital

09/26/2012 - 20:00
Editorial

Dear Friends,

As we begin the new year, we offer this “stockholders” report on the state of The Jewish Week — its past year and future plans — to you, our readers and supporters. And we ask for your help so that we can continue to provide you with high-quality journalism, and more, in future years.

Ours is a unique role, seeking to both cover, and help build, our Jewish community. That is a delicate task, merging the tasks of outsider and insider. But we think it is vital, and well worth the effort.

Jewish Week Receives Casey Medal Honor

Paper’s investigative series on child abuse in Orthodox community cited in national contest.
07/02/2012 - 20:00

Hella Winston, who has been reporting about the problem of child sexual abuse in the fervently Orthodox community for The Jewish Week for four years, and the paper’s managing editor, Robert Goldblum, received an Honorable Mention in the 2012 Casey Medals for Meritorious Journalism.

The awards were announced last week by The Journalism Center on Children and Families, which sponsors the investigative journalism contest, now in its 18th year.

Hella Winston: Her reporting, the Casey judges said, “encouraged abuse victims to come forward.”

Jewish Week Wins Six Awards From AJPA

Paper’s reporting sweeps top honors in both news and features categories.
06/18/2012 - 20:00
Assistant Managing Editor/Online Editor

The Jewish Week took home six awards for excellence in Jewish journalism from the American Jewish Press Association’s annual banquet in Philadelphia last week.

The awards included first- and second-place honors in both the news and feature categories in the annual Simon Rockower contest, as well as first-place honors for best personality profile and best special section.

Jewish Week writers who were honored last week by the AJPA are, from left, Eric Herschthal, Stewart Ain and Julie Wiener.

All She Wrote: Signing Off from The Jewish Week

Eventually, this day had to come, the day when I wrote my last blog for The Jewish Week. In the fall I'll be starting a Ph.D. program in U.S. history at Columbia, which means I'll no longer be able to hold this job.  But the good news is that I'll be able to freelance, so you can expect to see my by-line somewhere in The Jewish Week in the coming months.  

Jews and Affirmative Action: What the CUNY Diversity Plan Gets Wrong

The logic that recently led CUNY to carve a specific category for Jewish faculty members—“White/Jewish”—for its new Diversity Actions Plan makes sense.  Apparently many Jewish faculty members felt that “White/Caucasian” didn’t adequately define their sense of ethnic affiliation.  But in the past two weeks since the news broke—the New York Post, true to from, put it on everyone’s agenda with its klieg-lit

So Much For Remembering: On Israel Forgetting Its History, and Expelling African Refugees

So much for remembering our history; farewell to compassion. Those were my thoughts after reading the news this week that Israel officially began its plan to expel thousands of African immigrants, many of whom claim to be seeking political asylum.  On Monday, 115 Africans—mostly from South Sudan, which came into being only recently, after the horrors of Darfur—were arrested by the Israeli police. Another 73 were detained at the Israeli border.

Was Vatican II All That Good For The Jews? A Berkeley Historian Takes Up the Issue

Vatican II—the Catholic Church’s commission that liberalized many Catholic practices—was a watershed for Jews, too.  The most famous Jewish-related doctrine to come out of it, “Nostra Aetate,” bluntly denounced anti-Semitism, and perhaps most significantly, said that Jews today, and throughout history, should not be held responsible for Jesus’ death.  Most often, Vatican II is celebrated by Jews as a great turning-point for Catholics, and something of a mea culpa for the Church’s problematic relationship with the Nazis.  But

The Crisis of Peter Beinart: On New York Magazine's New Profile

What Peter Beinart doesn’t lack is attention—what he lacks is friends.  That’s the conclusion you can draw from New York magazine’s lengthy profile of Beinart, the fiery liberal Jewish journalist who recently published his jeremiad warning of Israel’s imminent demise.  In “The Crisis of Zionism,” Beinart’s much bally-hooed new book, he argues that if the state continues to hold

Obama on Jews and American History: A Speech Worth Remembering

Shame on me for not knowing that May was Jewish American Heritage Month.  To be sure, it lacks the profile of Black History Month, but apparently in Washington it’s a big deal.  I was reminded of that when I read about Obama’s closing remarks at the White House on Wednesday, when he took pains to highlight the central anecdote of historian Jonathan Sarna’s new book, “When General Grant Expelled the Jews.”

Caligula and the Jews

The tales of Caligula’s reign over Rome are so rich with gore, sadism and opulence that few bother even to check if they’re true.  That blithe disregard for factual accuracy is hard not to excuse, what with stories like this: one contemporary, writing in the first century A.D., wrote that the Caligula once had the father of a man he was executing watch his son die. Then, he had the father eat with him at dinner.  Other contemporary sources tell of Caligula’s alleged madness: he is said to have talked to horses, and insist that his own be installed in the Senate.

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