Jewish Republicans

Eric Cantor's remarkable rise to the GOP heights

Despite some high-profile losses, it's been a great night for the Republicans and a great one for Rep. Eric Cantor.

Cantor's easy reelection victory and the GOP conquest of the House – according to several network projections – mean he's now in line to become Majority Leader, second only to Rep. John Boehner, who is expected to easily win the Speakers position.

Cantor Could Help GOP Take the House, But Can He Win Over the Jews?

10/27/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) – Eric Cantor has spent a lifetime relishing in wearing the other hat.

Among Jews, the Republican congressional whip from Richmond, Va., likes to play the genteel Southern conservative, the posture that won over his wife, a socially liberal banker from New York.

Among southerners, he’s the nice Jewish boy who belongs to an Orthodox synagogue and graduated from Columbia Law School, but who has an easy familiarity with NASCAR, country music and evangelical beliefs.

Second Jewish Republican In The House?

Randy Altschuler is trailing in the polls but fickle Suffolk district ‘is a very volatile seat.’

10/19/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

It’s hard to imagine a congressional district where party affiliation has as little value as New York’s 1st CD in Suffolk County.

Republican Randy Altschuler, left, faces Democrat incumbent Tim Bishop in  a district where voters seem to have no strong party

Debating the AJC poll and the plight of Jewish Democrats

Only minutes after posting my story on the new American Jewish Committee poll and its plethora of bad news for President Obama, I received an email from an angry Democrat.

Sure, he said, the national downturn in the President's popularity is reflected in the Jewish numbers. But he argued that I downplayed the fact the Democrats still enjoy a close to three-to-one advantage over the Republicans in Jewish partisan identification.

The Politics Of Anger: Are Jews Becoming Republicans?

09/21/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The national anger found among the electorate concerns the economy, jobs, health care reform and foreign policy. In addition to recent primary victories around the country by Tea Party candidates, several national polls point to the depth of the public’s anger. A Fox News Poll from June noted that 83 percent of Republicans and 76 percent of Independents expressed dissatisfaction with the direction of the nation; in addition, 43 percent of Democrats expressed similar unhappiness with where the country is headed.

More on Obama's (liberal) Jewish problem, and a brighter future for Jewish Republicans

I've had some interesting feedback on my story last week on President Obama's “real” Jewish problem. No, it's not the problem of angry Jewish activists who think he's anti-Israel, but the disillusionment of many on the left over what they view as his overly centrist domestic policies.

Pew poll: Bad news for Jewish Democrats? It's complicated.

Jewish Democrats don't seem to be hitting any panic buttons in the wake of last week's Pew Center poll suggesting a significant shift of Jewish voters to the GOP side of the aisle just three months before critical midterm elections – the same poll that shows that only 34 percent of Americans now believe President Obama is a Christian.<

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