Jewish politics

Primary roundup: Sen. Arlen Specter loses; will Rand Paul's civil rights stance turn off Jewish voters?

It's going to be real interesting to see how conservative Jewish voters react to the remarkable ascendance of Rand Paul, who won the Kentucky senatorial primary last week.

Unlike his father, Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas), Rand is a supporter of Israel and sometimes sounds like he's reading from AIPAC talking points.

But he shares the libertarian hostility to most government programs and the Federal Reserve system, and he managed to stir up huge controversy this week with this comments about civil rights. While he says he doesn't favor repeal of the landmark 1964 Civil Rights Act, he doesn't support federal civil rights legislation, and he doesn't support laws that ban discrimination by private businesses, such as restaurants.

The Blumenthal Follies

It's starting to look as if Connecticut may not have two Jewish U.S. senators after all, thanks to yet another politician who believed voters are dolts and journalists are lazy.

Beinart's Buddy: Chait's Rebuttal on TNR.com

Nothing like the satisfaction of being right.  Yesterday, in a blog post, I predicted Peter Beinart's piece in The New York Review of Books would ignite a much needed debate.  And by this morning, dozens of media outlooks were linking to it: here, at Jeffrey Goldberg's Atlantic blog, on Ezra Klein's Washington Post blog, and so on. 

The Case for a Jewish Snopes

Note: Rabbi Jason Miller is traveling.  Filling in is Daniel Sieradski, former Director of Digital Media for JTA News and founding publisher of the pioneering blog Jewschool, is a web strategist and designer serving the Jewish non-profit sector.

J Street's risky move on Jerusalem

J Street wants clarification of what, exactly, the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations meant in its “My Jerusalem” advertisements this week, published in the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal.

Kagan’s Nomination And What It Means

Religion not seen as key dividing line in country.

05/12/2010
Washington Correspondent

 The argument that anti-Semitism still stifles Jewish achievement in modern America will be a little harder to make if President Barack Obama’s second Supreme Court nomination passes muster with the Senate.

If Kagan is confirmed, the Supreme Court will have six Catholics and three Jews. Getty Images

The perils of Arlen: does Specter have an Elena Kagan problem?

As if he needed more tsuris in in his fight for a sixth term – this time as a Democrat – Sen. Arlen Specter, the veteran Jewish lawmaker,  now may have a major Elena Kagan problem.

Kagan is President Obama's nominee to fill the seat of the retiring Justice John Paul Stevens, and Specter – back when he was a Republican, which was after he was Democrat – voted against her last year when Obama appointed her solicitor general.

Oren says Netanyahu not humiliated at White House, readers don't believe it

So Amb. Michael Oren, Israel's eloquent ambassador in Washington, says it didn't happen; Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu wasn't dissed when he came to the White House on March 23, according to this JTA  story  and numerous other reports.

Home of Tikkun’s Rabbi Lerner Vandalized

05/04/2010

(JTA) —  The northern California home of Rabbi Michael Lerner, editor of the progressive Tikkun magazine, was vandalized Sunday night. Posters attached to his door and the fence around his Berkeley home attack Lerner personally, and liberals and progressives, as being supporters of terrorism and “Islamofascism,” according to the magazine.

White House Charm Offensive Pays Off: Wiesel Says Tension is 'Gone’

05/04/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- When Elie Wiesel says it's all kosher, it's good.

For now, anyway.

President Obama capped an intensive two weeks of administration make-nice with Israeli officials and the American Jewish community by hosting Wiesel, the Nobel peace laureate and Holocaust memoirist, for lunch at the White House.

"It was a good kosher lunch," was the first thing Wiesel pronounced, emerging from the White House to a gaggle of reporters.

And not just the food.

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