Israeli-Palestinian negotiations

Obama to BBC: ‘Conditions on the Ground Have Changed’

05/19/2011 - 20:00

President Obama has elaborated upon his call for the 1967 lines to serve as the basis for a Palestinian state's border in an interview with the BBC.

"The basis for negotiations will involve looking at that 1967 border, recognizing that conditions on the ground have changed and there are going to need to be swaps to accommodate the interests of both sides," Obama told the BBC Thursday in an interview following his Middle East policy speech.

Obama's speech, AIPAC's problem

 President Barack Obama's “Cairo II” speech yesterday may have complicated life for the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), whose annual policy conference he will keynote on Sunday.

In his speech at the State Department, Obama advocated an Israeli-Palestinian agreement with borders “based on the 1967 lines with mutually agreed swaps, so that secure and recognized borders are established for both states.”

Digesting Obama’s Speech—Some Goes Down Easy, Some Hard

05/19/2011 - 20:00
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Within hours of President Obama's Middle East policy speech, Israeli leaders and Jewish groups on the left and right were picking through his remarks on Israel, alternately praising, fretting and criticizing.

The big news was that Obama called for negotiations based on the pre-1967 lines, with land swaps.

“We believe the borders of Israel and Palestine should be based on the 1967 lines with mutually agreed swaps, so that secure and recognized borders are established for both states," he said.

Obama: 1967 Borders With Swaps Should Serve as Basis for Negotiations

05/18/2011 - 20:00

WASHINGTON (JTA) – President Obama said the future state of Palestine should be based on the pre-1967 border with mutually agreed land swaps with Israel.

In his address Thursday afternoon on U.S. policy in the Middle East, Obama told an audience at the State Department that the borders of a "sovereign, nonmilitarized" Palestinian state "should be based on 1967 lines with mutually agreed swaps."

On Eve of Netanyahu Visit and AIPAC Conference, Obama and Bibi Appear on Same Page

05/16/2011 - 20:00
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Crush terrorists and then make peace.

Through quirks of timing, it's a narrative that President Obama and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu finally can agree on when they meet this week in Washington.

There remains a critical difference, however, between the two over what happens in the next chapter: Keep up the fight or step out and make peace.

The Obama administration, at least by default, seems to have embraced Netanyahu’s longtime mantra that the best way to clear the path to calm is through the elimination of terrorists.

Billionaire Adelson Defends Gingrich

Sheldon Adelson, the billionaire Las Vegas businessman and philanthropist, called me last Friday afternoon to complain about our story, “Will Gingrich Bomb With Jewish Republicans?” (May 13), saying it was “biased and prejudiced” and unfairly negative, “starting with the headline.”

He said he has known the former house speaker, who last week announced his candidacy for the Republican Presidential nomination, for close to two decades, and asserted that “no candidate is stronger” than Gingrich or more supportive of Israel.

Mitchell quitting; what took so long?

There's only one question I have about today's annoucement that U.S. Middle East envoy George Mitchell is calling it quits: what took so long?

With an administration that still can't decide if it wants to seriously press both sides to return to the negotiating table or offer U.S. proposals to break the stalemate and with Israeli and Palestinian leaders not much intererested in calls for a resumption of negotiations, it's not clear Mitchell had anything to do.

Barak Presents Plan for Israeli-Palestinian Agreement

05/10/2011 - 20:00

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak presented a plan for an agreement with the Palestinians.

The points could shed some light on the plan that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will present when he speaks to a joint session of the U.S. Congress later this month.

Israel will take "brave steps" and "make difficult decisions" for peace, Barak said Tuesday night at a reception for soldiers at the military's headquarters in Tel Aviv.

Recognizing And Responding To Real Enemies

05/09/2011 - 20:00
Editor And Publisher

Some people in Europe and elsewhere are deeply disturbed that the U.S. Navy Seals on their secret mission in Pakistan last week killed an unarmed Osama bin Laden. But it didn’t matter to me whether he was fighting back or not at the time he was shot.

Gary Rosenblatt

Obama Emboldened, But Old Middle East Obstacles Remain

Foreign policy victory in bin Laden killing may not lead to new peace initiatives.
05/02/2011 - 20:00
Washington Correspondent

The death of al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden at the hands of elite U.S. forces was a boost for a president with few foreign policy achievements to his credit. But it will do little to ease the foreign policy and political conundrums his administration faces in a changing Middle East, and in some cases may add new complications.

While the Palestinian Authority supported the U.S. action, Hamas quickly condemned the killing of a “holy warrior.”

Crowds gather in Times Square Sunday night as word spread that Osama bin Laden was killed by U.S. forces. photos Getty images
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