Israeli–Palestinian conflict

The last word on the Netanyahu - Obama summit: what we don't know

What we know after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's Washington visit this week: both the Israeli leader and President Obama have decided that for various reasons it's best not to be quarreling, especially in public. Both have a strong vested interest in restoring the public trappings of the “special” U.S.-Israel relationship.

The problem is what we don't  know; the pomp-rich visit leaves us with more questions than answers:

At Obama - Netanyahu Summit, Great Pomp But Questions Lingering

Bibi-Obama meeting high on atmospherics, low on specifics going forward.

07/07/2010
Washington Correspondent

President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu staged a diplomatic dance in Washington on Tuesday meant to show the world — and their respective constituencies — that they are still in step.  

But the carefully choreographed atmospherics belied potential difficulties ahead and many unanswered questions, starting with these: will President Barack Obama stick to his stated goal of moving aggressively on the Israeli-Palestinian front despite a plateful of international and domestic political problems?

President Obama and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had a “make-nice” meeting at the White House  Tuesday. getty images

Presbyterian Church working to undercut Israeli-Palestinian peace efforts?

If the Presbyterian Church (USA), which is meeting in Minneapolis this week, really cares about peace in the region it will soundly reject the latest report by its Middle East Study Committee.

This isn't about the frustrating search for some way to end the Middle East conflict; it's about a handful of determined Church activists with a serious grudge against the Jewish state, who don't much care that their churlish activism in the guise of religious morality is just making peace harder to attain.

Give Proximity Talks A Chance

05/04/2010

If you believe the conventional wisdom, nothing good is likely to come out of the Israeli-Palestinian “proximity talks” that will begin as soon as this week under the auspices of U.S. special negotiator George Mitchell.

There’s some solid logic behind that perception, but there is also a danger: in the Middle East, hopelessness is a contagion that can only result in more bloodshed and misery to populations that have known too much of both for generations.

On Jerusalem Day, Don’t Write Off Liberals

05/04/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

May 12 (Iyar 28) will mark 43 years since the Israeli army’s triumphal entry into the Old City of Jerusalem. This is certainly a moment for the Jewish People to celebrate the restoration of Judaism’s holiest sites to our people.

On Jerusalem Day, Don’t Write Out Jews On The Left

04/30/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

May 12 (Iyar 28) will mark 43 years since the Israeli army’s triumphal entry into the Old City of Jerusalem. This is certainly a moment for the Jewish People to celebrate the restoration of Judaism’s holiest sites to our people.

Ignoring Arab Hostility

04/27/2010

J Street’s Hadar Susskind is reported as saying that only those who wish to stall and make concessions “don’t want to see a serious U.S. plan” (‘Buzz Over U.S. Peace Plan Sparking Jitters,’ April 16).
 
If that is the only conclusion Susskind can draw about the motives of those with whom he disagrees, then it’s no surprise that Susskind ignores Arab hostility to Israel’s existence and prefers to substitute the fiction that conflict persists because Israel doesn’t make still more concessions to the Palestinians.

OK To Pressure Israel

04/27/2010

Stewart Ain’s article “U.S.-Israel Tensions Now Hitting Pulpits” (April 23), illustrates a high degree of ambivalence among American rabbis over President Barack Obama’s unprecedented serious, forthright and evenhanded efforts to achieve a lasting two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This is entirely understandable after eight years of totally laissez-faire U.S. diplomacy, which left the parties to their own devices, resulting in today’s virtually intractable stalemate, with the positions of both sides moving even further apart.

What About The Arab States?

04/27/2010

There’s been a lot of talk in the media about the Obama administration’s push for indirect “proximity” talks between Israel and the Palestinians, with special envoy George Mitchell serving as facilitator, referee and cheerleader, and about Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s reluctant agreement to participate.
 
You hear much less about how the Palestinians and the Arab states haven’t been much help to the administration’s faltering efforts.
 

Uphill Battle to Build Palestinian Nonviolent Movement

04/27/2010
JTA

BIL’IN, West Bank (JTA) – Rami Burnat sits in his wheelchair toward the back of a sprawling courtyard where Palestinian speakers take turns championing the cause of nonviolent resistance.

Burnat, 29, has been disabled ever since a bullet pierced his neck in clashes in late 2000, shortly after the second intifada began. Still an activist, Burnat is among a small but growing number of Palestinians trying to mount a new kind of intifada against Israel: a nonviolent one.

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