iPod

The Shivah Video Game is Back

"Russell Stone is a rabbi at a poor synagogue in New York City. He is a devout man with a problem. Membership is way down and he lacks the funds to keep his synagogue open. Things are looking very bleak, and he has grown progressively more cynical and bitter with the passage of time. Just as he is on the verge of packing it all in, he receives some interesting news. A former member of his congregation has died and left the rabbi a significant amount of money. A blessing? Or the start of something far more sinister? Can Rabbi Stone just accept the money and move on? His conscience says no. Step into his shoes as he travels all over Manhattan in his attempt to uncover the truth."

The Shivah video game is a murder mystery featuring a rabbi. Originally released in 2006, it's now available in the App Store.

Omer Counting in the Digital Age

What Are the Top Jewish Apps?

The Orthodox Union (OU) has just released a new mobile app that will be helpful for those seeking knowledge on what food products are kosher for Passover. The new app allows the user to enter any food item or product to gather all of the kosher information including if the certification is up to date.

I would certainly add this helpful utility app to the listing of the best Jewish apps that I recently published here on The Jewish Week website and in a special "Looking Ahead Looking Back" supplement. Here is the article:

The OU launches new kosher app in time for Passover preparations and the 2011's best mobile apps

Experiencing Israel's Majesty Each Day Through New Mobile App Israel365

Like many American rabbis who relocate to Israel on aliyah, Rabbi Naftali "Tuly" Weisz began to look for a way to make a difference in the Holy Land. The 30-something Modern Orthodox rabbi had already made some significant relationships with the Israel-loving Evangelical Christian community in his hometown of Columbus, Ohio.
 

British Chief Rabbi Backtracks After Jobs Jabs

11/20/2011

(JTA) -- Britain's Chief Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks was not criticizing Steve Jobs when he said the late co-founder of Apple created a selfish society based on consumerism, the rabbi's office said.

Israeli Engineer Creates Universal Remote App for the Man Cave

Using your iPhone or Android-powered smartphone to operate your television, Blue-Ray player, DVD, stereo, or well, anything else electronic in your house should really be a no-brainer at the end of 2011. After all, I remember using several PDA’s from the Sony Clie to the Palm/Handspring models to operate my TV as far back as a decade ago. However, there has been a dearth of apps available for download that allow you to control your entertainment system (although this is a standard feature of the Sony Tablet S).

Itai Ben-Gal & Victor Nemirovsky simply wanted to create a universal remote app, but launched a million-dollar company instead

Purim in the Digital Age

Leave it to Robert Pass, creator of the Jewish iPhone Community, to put together a comprehensive website with everything a connected, Jewish techie needs to celebrate Purim in the Digital Age. In addition to the Grogger Factory's 2010 contribution to iPurim with their virtual grogger, there are a host of other apps (some old, some new) for this year's Purim celebration. Check out the Purim page of the Jewish iPhone Community.

Alef Bet Learning for Kids on iPad

At a recent Family Camp experience with twenty other young Jewish families, I noticed something that had changed from the previous year's gathering. iPads. This year, they were everywhere. You might think that it was the adults using Apple's slick tablets to read books, check email, or play Angry Birds. But it was actually the youngest of participants who were using the iPad, which could be the most expensive toy for the under 5 demographic.

Jewish children will use Mom & Dad's iPad to learn the Hebrew alphabet

Best Jewish Apps of 2010 for iPhone & Android

 My list of the Best Jewish Apps of 2010 here at The Jewish Week has generated a lot of attention. The list of thirty-three apps for the iPhone, iPad and Android phones has been reposted on several blogs around the Web.

With hundreds of thousands of apps available for download, there's no dearth of Jewish themed apps - from useful to kitschy!

Is it Wii or Mii in the iGeneration?

When I hooked up my kids' new Nintendo Wii a couple years ago, I noticed that each player has to create their own Mii. The significance wasn't lost on me (or is it Mii?). As I set up this new video gaming device, I wondered if it would promote community or promote loneliness.

Would other kids join my children in the basement as they all took turns participating in an activity that prioritizes the Wii... or would each child find himself "bowling alone" with an interactive television in the basement thereby prioritizing the Mii?

Does technology enhance community or kill it?
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