Immouzer camp

Slow Cooked Through the Ages

The story of cholent goes to the heart of Jewish history and tradition.

Special to the Jewish Week
04/28/2010

The origins of cholent, the thick, slow-cooked savory Shabbat stew, the traditional Sabbath midday meal, go all the way back to the time of the Talmud. Indeed, its history takes it on a route so dispersed across centuries and cultures throughout the diaspora, that in different countries it’s alternatively known as hamin (Aramaic for warm, Hebrew for hot); or dafina or adafina (Arabic for “covered”). There are even variants in its Yiddish name, whether schalet in the Yiddish of Germany or shulet in the Yiddish of Eastern Europe.

PHOTO: American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee. Baking challah for Shabbat at the Immouzer camp.
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