Hungary

Survivors Can’t Get Justice In Hungary: Lawyers

In Chicago court, growing anti-Semitism cited in restitution cases.

10/01/2014
Staff Writer
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In April, Hungary’s far-right Jobbik party — described by the president of the European Jewish Congress as an “unabashedly neo-Nazi party” — won more than 20 percent of the vote in Hungary’s parliamentary election.

Far-right Jobbik party leader Gabor Vona after winning 20 percent of the country's parliamentary election. Getty Images

Hungarian Official Reassures Jews on Bris And Kashout

03/26/2014

 A Hungarian official said his government is committed to safeguarding religious freedoms, including circumcision and kosher slaughter.

Ferenc Kumin, a government spokesman, delivered the assurances Monday at a news conference by Nir Natan, a representative of the Brussels-based European Jewish Association.

“In the past couple of years there has been a surge of legislation in Europe, mainly bans on circumcision and ritual, kosher slaughter,” Natan said, then asked if it could also happen in Hungary.

“You can quote me when I say that no, for sure not,” Kumin said. “It’s not on the agenda and if it’s put there, we will stop it.”

The meeting was part of the two-day biannual conference of the Rabbinical Centre of Europe this week in Budapest. Hundreds of Orthodox rabbis came to the Hungarian capital as the campaign for general elections on April 6 reached its apex.

“What we are interested in is to make the Jewish renaissance grow bigger and to show to the world that the Jewish community here enjoys nothing but freedom,” said Kumin, who represents the government of Viktor Orban, head of the conservative Fidesz party, which is expected to win with at least 36 percent of the vote.

Orban’s government rejects allegations by critics that it is trying to whitewash Hungary’s Holocaust-era culpability and is too lenient on expressions of anti-Semitism.

“The government has a zero tolerance policy on anti-Semitism,” Kumin said.

Rabbi Menachem Margolin, the rabbinical centre’s director general, credited the government with “doing a lot for the Jewish community, and not only ahead of elections.” He also lauded the government for its resolve to allow Jewish rituals “that help sustain the incredible vibrancy” of Hungary’s Jewish community.

In Hungary, Nationalist Rhetoric On The Rise

As Jobbik popularity grows, ruling party sounding ominous notes.

03/25/2014
JTA

Budapest, Hungary — A lone heckler tried to disrupt him, but Hungarian lawmaker Janos Hargitai was undeterred as he spoke earlier this month at a memorial day gathering in Hungary commemorating the 1848 revolution there.

A rally in Budapest against government plan to erect a statue presenting Hungary as an innocent victim of Nazi occupation. JTA

From A 2012 ADL Survey Of Europe

Quote Source: 

“Levels of anti-Semitism have increased most dramatically in Hungary.”

Hungarian Jews Today

Bigotry, Holocaust distortion confront a community balancing fear and hope.

03/12/2014
Associate Editor

Seventy years after the decimation of Hungarian Jewry in 1944, the surviving community is balancing fear and hope in a country that has rarely rewarded the latter.

Members of the Hungarian Jewish community and their supporters protest the election of a far-right party. Getty Images

Yizkor For The Hungarian Shoah

This is the 70th anniversary of the Holocaust coming to Hungary.

03/12/2014
Associate Editor

Editor's Note: Click here for a news update on the 70th anniversary of the Hungarian Shoah.

In the Hungarian village of Csenger, by the banks of the river Smoosh, in the pages in a yizkor book, a dead man tells a tale. It is 1938. “Nine o’clock one Shabbos morning, people could be seen gathering together near the big market place,” looking up at the sky. “I was also standing there,” says the witness, “and in the middle of the crowd was a man with black glasses (probably binoculars) who kept passing them around in the crowd, and people kept looking upward … they saw two suns, one near the next.” Some say “the world is coming to an end.” The elders remember this omen in 1914, before the terrible war.

Hungarian Jews rounded up in Budapest in 1944. Wikimedia Commons

New York Times Polls Hungarians On Anti-Semitism

12/27/2013
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The New York Times is conducting a survey of Hungarian Jews to help deepen its coverage of anti-Semitism in that country.

The survey, published online Tuesday, asks respondents whether they experienced anti-Semitism and considered emigrating as a result, among other questions.

Hungary Launches PR Blitz To Combat Extremist Image

Heavyweight N.Y. firm behind effort to reach out to Jewish community.

10/23/2013
JTA
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Washington — Armed with a powerful New York public relations outfit and a pledge to commemorate the mass deportation of Hungarian Jewry, the Hungarian government is preparing to challenge what it says is an inaccurate image of a country lax in confronting home-grown extremism.

How Bad Is Anti-Semitism In Hungary?

10/22/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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My mother’s favorite story: Two Jews in post-Anschluss Vienna are walking through an anti-Semitic neighborhood. They see that they are being followed by two Nazi thugs. One of the Jews says to his friend, “We’d better make a run for it; there are two of them, and we are all alone.”

Jerome A. Chanes

Cultivating Jewish Leaders, In Hungary

How do you create young Jewish global leaders? Video blogger Aaron Herman spoke with alumni and staff of Camp Szarvas about how they are enhancing our global Jewish community. 

The Szarvas Fellowships are administered by The Ronald S. Lauder Foundation, in association with the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee.
 

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