the holocaust

UN Envoy: We Won't Accept Bad Deal On Iran

'Mistrust of past is deep,' Samantha Power, top U.S. diplomat, tells ADL at centennial gathering; vows to stand up for Israel in world body.

10/31/2013
Assistant Managing Editor
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America's top envoy to the world community, Samantha Power, told leaders of the Anti-Defamation League Thursday that the Obama administration stands firm against Iran's nuclear program and isn't weakening its position, despite emerging dialogue between the two countries.

"No deal is better than a bad deal" on nuclear disarmament, said Power, who succeeded Susan Rice as United Nations Ambassador in August. "We will not accept a bad deal."

Power talk: "On my watch we will push ceaselessly for further inclusion of Israel in regional groups." David Karp for ADL

A Message From Pope Francis To A Son Of Holocaust Survivors

10/25/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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Pope Francis is an extraordinary man.

Menachem Rosensaft

False Heroes And The Holocaust: Disputing The ‘Brava Gente’

07/01/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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Every age needs its heroes, so it seems. And in post-war Italy, a low level official named Giovanni Palatucci seemed to fit the bill. But recent reports challenge Palatucci’s legacy as the “Italian Schindler” and in so doing trigger a question, Why are we so attached to uplifting Holocaust narratives?

 Alexis Herr is a doctoral candidate at the Strassler Family Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Clark University.

Director Janet Tobias and Cave Explorer Chris Nicola

Aaron Herman spoke with Director Janet Tobias and Caver Chris Nicola of No Place On Earth.

 No Place On Earth is a documentary that plays like a feature film, bringing to life fear, bravery and youthful adventure. Artfully directed re-enactments help visualize the incomparable existences above and below ground; these scenes are narrated by actors whose script comes from Esther Stermer's memoir We Fight to Survive and writing of other survivors.</p>

Beyond Semantics: 'Polish Death Camps' And The Suffering Of A Nation

In Poland last year to help the small Jewish community of Poznan lead its Pesach seders, I spent some time in a small café down the street from the city’s former synagogue (serving since communist times as a municipal swimming pool) with the director of a small art gallery.

Polish camp, or Nazi camp in occupied Poland?

Obama To Visit Holocaust Museum

President Obama will visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on Monday to mark the Days of Remembrance established by Congress.  He will speak about how the United States is honoring the pledge of "never again" by developing a comprehensive strategy to prevent and respond to mass atrocities, the White House reports.

He will be introduced by Nobel Peace Prize laureate and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel, and will tour the museum.

Notes on the Closing of Yale's Anti-Semitism Center

Last week, Yale made national headlines when it decided to close its five-year-old anti-Semitism institute. The decision came after a growing number of scholars began to question whether it was promoting anti-Arab sentiment, rather than coolly objective academic scholarship.  Not to toot my own horn, by I saw this one coming. 

The Holocaust and Pacifists: Would Pacifism Saved More Jews than War?

The thought seems outrageous: that pracifism, a principled objection to America's entrance into World War II, would have saved more Jews than fighting Hitler and defeating Nazism altogether.  But that is the argument that Nicolson Baker, the novelist and author of the 2008 pacifist's interpretation of the war, Human Smoke, makes in his month's Harper's.  And his case is compelling.

Recommended Readings: On Libya; Arabs Against Arab Anti-Semitism; and the French, Fashion and Jews

Pardon my bloggerly desuetude, but last week I was out on vacation.  Now I'm back, and to make up for the lost time in blog-o-land, I'm posting a few longer essays you might have missed. (I did, at least.)

"Shoah" and The New Yorker's Mea Culpa

When Claude Lanzmann's nine-and-a-half hour epic "Shoah" debuted in 1985, much of Europe was aghast, infuriated, ashamed -- and profoundly moved. No film to date had captured the devolution of humanity that the Holocaust required -- and, years later, the sublimated memory and even outright denial that bystanders, Nazis and even victims still maintained.  

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