Herzog

Starting The Season Off — With Flavor

A quintet of new wines for the New Year.

Special To The Jewish Week
09/10/2014

On Wednesday, Aug. 22, in synagogues around the world, the first of the pre-Rosh HaShanah shofar blasts were blown, to note the beginning of the month of Elul. For the kosher wine industry, those shofar blasts were like a starters’ pistol, marking the beginning of an annual race to bring the new crop of kosher wines to the market.  During the next month (and during the month before Passover) more kosher wine will be sold than at any times during the year. 

A variety of new wines, and new vintages, add joy to the Jewish New Year.

Christian Zionist Hagee Gives Nearly $1 Million To Nefesh B'Nefesh

11/03/2011

John Hagee Ministries distributed $6 million to Israeli charities, with the largest chunk going to Nefesh B'Nefesh, a group that encourages immigration to Israel from English-speaking countries.

Nefesh B'Nefesh received $900,000 in the awards announced after the 30th annual Night to Honor Israel held at Hagee's Cornerstone megachurch in San Antonio, Texas. Organizers said the event drew 7,000 people.

Laughing at 9/11? A Jewish Perspective

New York magazine's Sept. 11 issue has arrived, and it's a real treat.   The whole issue has been turned into an encyclopedia of Sept. 11-related entries, including everything from "freedom fries" to "Abbottabad," and many of them penned by wonderful writers.  Mark Lilla's in there, as is Eliza Griswold. I haven't read them all, but one caught my eye in particular: Jim Holt's entry for "Humor."  

Grape Expectations

The long journey of the Herzogs, the family behind the Royal Wine Corp.

Special To The Jewish Week
03/03/2011

From old world to new; from yeshiva to board room; from amassing great wealth to losing it all to earning it back: For more than 250 years, back to the days when Mozart was composing, the Herzog family — the largest player in the kosher wine industry today — has traveled great distances and bridged gaping contradictions.
But the journey it is now in the midst of — moving the kosher wine consumer to dry wines — may be the family’s toughest one yet.

Phillip “Baron” Herzog, left, and Rabbi  Yonah  Tzvi “Eugene” Herzog, who arrived in New York in 1948.
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