Hebrew

Alef Bet Learning for Kids on iPad

At a recent Family Camp experience with twenty other young Jewish families, I noticed something that had changed from the previous year's gathering. iPads. This year, they were everywhere. You might think that it was the adults using Apple's slick tablets to read books, check email, or play Angry Birds. But it was actually the youngest of participants who were using the iPad, which could be the most expensive toy for the under 5 demographic.

Jewish children will use Mom & Dad's iPad to learn the Hebrew alphabet

New Musical Life For A Supposedly Dead Language

Adrienne Cooper performs new/old Yiddish songs at Drom.

11/04/2010
Special To The Jewish

Jewish history is too unpredictable for folks to count out the Yiddish language just yet. After all, 200 years ago Hebrew was supposedly a dead language used only in Jewish worship. Could there be a real-life version of the mythical “Yiddishland?”

“I don’t think there’s going to be a secular Yiddish community in which people live everyday lives in Yiddish,” Adrienne Cooper reluctantly admits. “But among artists there’s no reason this material can’t be taken up as a means of creative communication.”

New CD consists entirely of material that is either brand new or significantly re-imagined Yiddish songs

Summertime, And The Speaking Is Hebrew

08/10/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

By 8 a.m., the air hung heavily across the Northeast, a thick curtain of suffocating warmth that quickened tempers and slowed thoughts. But Andrew, a counselor at the Ramah Day Camp in Nyack, bounded off the bus with his usual energy. 

“The camp has declared it a Yom Cham,” said Andrew, flashing a smile that seldom seemed to falter. On this Yom Cham or “Hot Day,” explained Andrew, Nyack campers would engage in a slew of water activities, a giant inflatable slide, sponge tag and lots of free swim in the brecha — AKA the pool.

Elana Shohamy on the Arabic and Hebrew Languages: Part 1

Hebrew swallows Arabic and Russian in Israel! Linguist Elana Shohamy of Tel Aviv University talks about the Israeli government's 'benign neglect' of Arabic and the fate of Yiddish, Russian and other 'language victims.' (In two parts)

Syndicate content