Harold Robinson

Jewish Soldiers Fighting Enemies, And Stereotypes

A meditation on Memorial Day.
Editor And Publisher

This Monday is Memorial Day.

For most of us that means no work — a holiday that is more about family barbecues and shopping sales than remembering those who gave their lives to protect our freedom. 

That’s especially true for a Jewish community that knows few who serve in today’s all-volunteer military. Can you name even two people in active service? How about one?

Gary Rosenblatt

Looking For A Seder In Baghdad?

"I happen to be in Iraq and am looking for a place to spend Passover," read the e-mail message I received Monday night. That got my attention.

It was from a Jewish woman from Washington, D.C., who said she had arrived in Baghdad two days earlier as a consultant for USAID (U.S. Agency for International Development). She wrote she had come on short notice and had "no time to plan for Passover, aside from bringing a couple of boxes of matzah ball soup mix. No one else who is here is Jewish."

When Veterans Come Home

Special To The Jewish Week

Much of the public thinks of a soldier’s return home as a joyous time for the veteran and his or her family, but the reality can be more complicated, said Jacob Remo, the commander of a Jewish War Veterans post near Boston and a member of JWV’s Health Initiatives Committee.

The transition from war to peace is often difficult as roles change within the family, as the soldier returns to work or looks for a new job and as civilian life begins anew, Remo said, adding that all members of the family feel the stress.

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