Haredi community

Breaching The Wall Of Silence On Domestic Abuse

In Israel’s haredi community, leading rabbis are now working with experts to dismantle a culture of secrecy.

10/16/2013
JTA
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Beit Shemesh, Israel — It was only when her sons came at her with knives that she realized keeping quiet was not going to work.

Bat Melech founder Noach Korman at the Bat Melech shelter in Beit Shemesh. Ben Sales

Where Frum And Savvy Collide

Given economic realities, haredi businesswomen are breaking down stereotypes and taking their places in the workforce.

Israel Correspondent
06/19/2012

Jerusalem — When “Rivky,” a fervently Orthodox woman with “a very large family” — she declined to provide numbers, fearful of tempting fate — opened a woman’s clothing shop in the basement of her Jerusalem home 40 years ago, and the need to advertise came up, “there was only one newspaper serving the ‘frum oylom’” she recalled, referring to the “religious world” in Yiddish-accented English. Today, the grandmother said, the growing haredi community “is fragmented.”

Marci Rapp, creator of MarSea Modest Swimwear, was one of the 200 participants at the Kishor conference for religious women.

Will Asifa Net Results?

At Citi Field event, signs abounded that the web is deeply ingrained in haredi life.

05/22/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

In Hebrew, English and Yiddish, speaker after speaker inveighed against the evils of the Internet in the most strident of tones before 40,000 haredi men at Citi Field on Sunday night. The Internet was called “a minefield of immorality,” “the opposite of kedusha” [holiness], “shmutz” [filth] and, in the words of Ecclesiastes, “vanity of vanities.”

A crowd of 40,000 haredi men Sunday heard Orthodox leaders inveighing against the Internet. Getty Images

Take Me Out Of The Ballgame

05/22/2012
Editorial

The notion of 40,000 haredi and chasidic men coming out on a lovely Sunday evening to Citi Field — a sell-out crowd — not to watch a Mets game but to decry the evils of the Internet makes the attendees of this week’s rally an easy target for ridicule to many people. After all, the Internet is a reality, and prayer and preaching won’t make it go away.

Haredi Leaders Plan Rally At Citi Field to Highlight Internet’s Dangers

04/29/2012

Haredi Orthodox leaders are planning what they say will be a massive rally in New York City to call attention to the dangers of modern digital technology.

Tens of thousands are expected to gather for a May 20 rally at Citi Field, the Mets' baseball stadium in Queens. The Hebrew-language Jewish Daily News reported that $1.5 million has been raised so far from donors to pay for the event.

Haredi Leaders Plan Rally At Citi Field to Highlight Internet’s Dangers

04/29/2012

Haredi Orthodox leaders are planning what they say will be a massive rally in New York City to call attention to the dangers of modern digital technology.

Tens of thousands are expected to gather for a May 20 rally at Citi Field, the Mets' baseball stadium in Queens. The Hebrew-language Jewish Daily News reported that $1.5 million has been raised so far from donors to pay for the event.

‘Unorthodox’ Author’s Claim Of Cover-up Is Countered

Coroner’s report lists 20-year-old’s death in Kiryas Joel as suicide, not murder.

02/21/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

With allegations of communal cover-ups involving child sexual abuse dogging the haredi community over the past several years, it may not be much of a stretch for some readers to believe a gruesome story that appears in a new memoir about growing up in, and leaving, the Satmar community.

Deborah Feldman’s book about her departure from haredi life includes the account of a Satmar man’s suspicious death.
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