Hadassah Hospital

Can Hadassah, At 100, Go Virtual?

As iconic women’s group marks its centennial, it’s not standing pat in a fast-changing Jewish world. But can it lure enough young blood?

Staff Writer
06/19/2012

The birthday girl is turning 100 this year, and she says she’s feeling just fine, thank you. She’s still raising tons of money, has a membership role that continues to grow and is still improving health care in Israel through its world-class hospital.

But this is not your grandmother’s Jewish community anymore. And the jury is out on whether Hadassah, the Women’s Zionist Organization of America, which marks its centennial this year, can be relevant to young Jewish women in a fast-moving world.

Participants in a Hadassah training session reflect a range of generations. Courtesy of Hadassah

Palestinian Conjoined Twins Separated At Hadassah Hospital

12/27/2011

Surgeons at Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem separated conjoined twins in utero.

The babies shared a placenta and major blood vessels. Their lives were in danger in the womb of their 25-year-old mother, from a Palestinian village, who was in her 20th week of pregnancy.

The babies' blood supply was separated using a laser device inserted in the womb.

Meanwhile, an Israeli business daily reported that Hadassah Medical Center's debt to its suppliers is reportedly about $2.65 million, and it can’t pay the bill.

In the war on breast cancer, Israel leads

11/01/2010
JTA

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- Irit Paneth, in and out of remission from breast cancer for more than a decade, was among the thousands who wound their way like a giant pink-and-white ribbon through Jerusalem's streets in the first Susan G. Komen Foundation’s Race for the Cure held in Israel.

"What's important here is to raise awareness," Paneth said during the Oct. 28 march, wearing the pink T-shirt reserved for breast cancer survivors.

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