gun violence

Forum On Gun Violence Reflects Community’s Attitudes (Story and Video)

Local congressman, Newtown father address audience at Stephen Wise Free Synagogue.

04/30/2013
Jewish Week Correspondent

Leslie Gottlieb, a lay leader at New York’s Stephen Wise Free Synagogue, noted the obvious Monday night while speaking to a reporter:

Mark Barden, whose son was killed in the Sandy Hook shootings, Rep. Jerrold Nadler and Perry Gershon. Rob Buchwald

Gun Violence Prevention Sabbath To Be Observed At 150 Shuls And Churches

01/18/2013

As President Barack Obama seeks support for his sweeping gun control reforms, and states enact their own legislation -- including the nation's toughest in New York -- a faith-based coalition is promoting a national  Gun Violence Prevention Sabbath.

President Obama signs letters from children after unveiling new gun control proposals on Jan. 16. (White House Photo)

The Lesson NOT To Learn From Newtown

12/20/2012
Jewish Week Online Columnist

Of the many critical insights I gained by studying the writings of the late theologian and philosopher Abraham Joshua Heschel, one that had a particularly profound impact on me related to the challenge of talking about God. 

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik is the spiritual leader of the Forest Hills Jewish Center in Queens.

Talking To Kids About Mental Health: The Other Topic After Sandy Hook

12/17/2012

As soon as I heard the news about the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary school, I immediately thought to myself in horror “What if one of my kids had been a victim?”  I also knew as soon as I thought it that there would have been absolutely nothing I could have done to prevent it had either or both of my 11-year old twins been in the worst possible place at the worst possible time. 

But my next thought was even more upsetting: “What if one of my kids had been the shooter?” 

Deborah Grayson-Riegel

The Sad Case Of Trayvon Martin

03/30/2012
Jewish Week Online Columnist

No matter how one chooses to parse the still sketchy details, the recent death by gunfire of African-American teenager Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida is a great tragedy. A young life was violently taken because of an all-too-easily arrived at suspicion based on stereotype. See a black teen wearing a “hoodie” in a white, gated community and, as the shooter George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer, himself said to police, one must assume that he’s “up to no good.”

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik is rabbi of the Forest Hills Jewish Center.
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