Route 17: Season Of Yizkor

The portal opens as quick as a dream.
09/24/2012 - 20:00
Associate Editor

This is the season of memory, of Yizkor. The memorial prayer for loved ones is recited four times in a year, two of them in these days between Yom Kippur and Shemini Atzeret.

Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach: Yizkor’s brevity reflects the brief connection between This World and the Next.

I Do Not Grieve For My Son's Disability

Editor's Note: This blog originally appeared on newsworks.

It's been over a decade since my son George, 13, was diagnosed with autism, which means that it's been that long that I've been a member of a certain tribe: that of special needs parents.

Through the ups and downs of the challenges that my husband and I have faced coming to understand how best to meet our son's needs, I've met, shared with, laughed and cried with so many resilient, insightful, spiritual, funny parents who are doing what I'm doing—extreme parenting with no road map, taking life not one day, but one hour and sometimes one minute at a time.

Despite the intensity of the experience, many, though certainly not all, of us live with a sense of purpose and even a sense of peace.

The author with her son, George. Courtesy of Gabrielle Kaplan-Mayer

Coming Home, Moving On

Joshua Henkin’s latest novel focuses on a family reunion in the Berkshires, filled with memories and surprises.
07/30/2012 - 20:00
Book Critic

The summer house in Lenox, Massachusetts where Joshua Henkin’s accomplished new novel is set has a tennis court out back, a garden, and, on its interior walls, street maps of Paris, Kathe Kollwitz etchings and faded portraits of great-grandparents. Family history also spills out of closets, with sports equipment of earlier eras, a never-worn wedding dress (the engagement was broken), outgrown sneakers and spare flip-flops.

Joshua Henkin’s “group book” centers around three days in the life of a Jewish family.  Matthew Polis

Sending Social Networking Sympathies

The story was recently told to me about a Facebook user who updated her status message to announce the death of her grandmother and the grief she was feeling because of the loss. Her friend's mother, a Facebook newbie, read the status update and clicked Facebook's "Like" option. Was this a Facebook faux pas or a way to express condolences in the era of social networking?

A Photo of a Tombstone on Facebook
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