Gallup poll

The Haunting Voice Of The Refugee

Responding to the great moral challenge of our time. A first-hand report on the Syrian refugee crisis.

07/18/2016 - 13:50

The question:  Should we allow a large number of refugees to come to the United States to live?  The answer in a Gallup poll was 21 percent yes, 72 percent no, and seven percent had no opinion.  This is not about our response to the Syrian refugees today; it comes from a 1938 Gallup Poll about allowing European Jews into the U.S.

Tortured for his views: Mazen al-Hamada made his way to Amsterdam after imprisonment for criticizing the Syrian regime.

Gallup Poll: Growing Number Of Palestinians Believe In ‘Armed Struggle’ Against Israel

11/08/2015 - 19:00

Jerusalem — Nearly one-third of Palestinians believe in “armed struggle and military solutions” to the conflict with Israel, an increase from two years ago.

Palestinian protesters throwing stones and burning tires during clashes with Israeli security forces over the Al-Aqsa mosque.JTA

Poll: Americans More Apt To Back Jewish Candidates Than Evangelicals, Muslims Or Atheists

06/22/2015 - 20:00

Ninety-one percent of Americans said they would vote for a presidential candidate who is Jewish, according to a new poll.

Poll: American Jewish Support For Obama Dropping

04/14/2015 - 20:00

Job approval ratings for President Obama have dropped among American Jews from 61 percent to 50 percent since the start of 2015, a new Gallup poll found.

Lawyers, Lobbyists Battle In Diplomatic Intifada

The next stage in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is the diplomatic intifada.  Both sides are mobilizing their lawyers and lobbyists to do battle on several fronts, but primarily in The Hague and in Washington, D.C.

Since neither side has shown much interest in sitting down at the peace table for serious negotiations, they've opted for the battle of the briefcases.

The American Jewish Vote: Not All About Israel

02/13/2012 - 19:00
Jewish Week Online Columnist

Whether or not a candidate for public office supports the state of Israel is important to American Jews, but it is not the only issue we care about.

Indeed, in 2012 it is highly likely that all major Presidential candidates will be pro-Israel, so American Jewish voters can concentrate on voting for the candidate who best embodies the principles of the Torah and the American republic.

Rabbi Yanklowitz is founder and president of Uri L'Tzedek, director of Jewish life and senior Jewish educator at UCLA Hillel.
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