Fred Allen

The American Dream, On Rye

Remembering the Stage Deli, and the cultural power of a stuffed pastrami sandwich.

12/11/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

For the price of a sandwich, you got a little piece — call it a shtickel — of fame.

How else to explain the exceedingly long run of the Stage Deli, the iconic New York eatery that closed at the end of last month after overstuffing its sandwiches, and its customers, for three-quarters of a century? That the storied Stage finally closed up shop is perhaps less remarkable than the fact that it survived for so long, far outlasting the cultural milieu from which it so sparklingly sprang.

Of all delis, the Stage was most an extension of Broadway. Miyan Levenson

Forgotten Voices

On ultra-Orthodox Israelis wearing yellow stars in protesting alleged bias.

01/10/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

San Francisco's Ghirardelli Square is a Mecca for tourists. Predictably it also attracts entrepreneurs interested in revenue sharing. You can hear every San Francisco song in creation performed on every conceivable instrument; you can have your portrait done for $15, your caricature for $10, or your silhouette cut for $5.

One aged hustler, in particular, caught my attention, in part, because he could not attract anyone else's. He was lying in a recliner. When open, his eyes were glazed, but most of the time that I observed, they were closed.

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