Food & Wine | Recipes

04/10/2014 | Section: Recipes

There's nothing worse than finishing up your seder with a cake that tastes like... matzah. But when it comes to Passover baking, that's often the case: Matzah meal replaces the flour, leaving desserts that are heavy and dense, with that unappealing flavor. No more! This delicious gluten-free dessert forgets all about matzah, using only natural ingredients for the perfect light, sweet end to your seder.

04/04/2014 | Section: Recipes

Potatoes, potatoes, potatoes. They're pretty much a staple of every Passover meal: Without bread or pasta, potatoes are the go-to carb. Now, I love potatoes, so I'm happy to see them over and over again, but sometimes even I get bored of the classic roasted or mashed. These lacy little shredded potato cups, which you can fill with just about anything, are a great way to add a little wow factor to the taste and presentation of your next potato dish. 

03/31/2014 | Section: Recipes
Matzah + chocolate = yum. Photo courtesy of Amy Kritzer

This is the second installment of our new series "The Remix" in which we seek to gently tweak the more challenging dishes in the Jewish culinary cannon. With a little bit of love, we’re convinced we can make even these dishes delicious, even the ones that seem bizarre to the modern palate.

03/31/2014 | Section: Recipes
Sponge cake with zabaglione and oranges. Ronnie Fein/JW

Sponge cake is the new flourless chocolate cake.

03/20/2014 | Section: Recipes

Jews love Chinese food. It's well-documented, and even the subject of a paper I wrote in college (I got an A-). But here's another thing we love: leftovers. And the two often go hand in hand: who hasn't ended up with a cardboard carton of white rice in the fridge after indulging in some beef lo mein or General Tso's chicken?

03/13/2014 | Section: Recipes

These days, the biggest trend in the classic Purim treats is wild and wacky flavors - in both the dough and the filling - like these red velvet variety from What Jew Wanna Eat, or rum-raisin from Trini Gourmet or this pear and goat cheese offering from Joy of Kosher.

03/10/2014 | Section: Recipes
 An ecumenical treat boasting Ashkenazi origins and Sephardi influences. Amy Kritzer

Welcome to our new series in which we seek to gently tweak the anachronisms of the Jewish culinary canon (shav, we’re looking at you). With a little bit of love, we’re convinced we can reclaim the dishes that seem the strangest to the modern palate. Sweet and sour tongue, anyone?

First up, because it’s that time of year: hamantaschen. They’re cookies, so what could be bad, right? Sadly, plenty.