The Finkler Question

The Mighty Walzer Returns: An Interview with Howard Jacobson

New York's nightly cultural offerings are the city's greatest attraction, as well as its most despairing.  Every night there's something enticing to hear, see or do, but the guilt quickly settles in after you realize most of them you'll miss. Thankfully, there are reviews.

The Man Booker Question: "The Finkler Question"?

As a general rule, I don't cheerlead for people I've written about.  But I'll allow myself this: hats off, again, to Howard Jacobson, whose novel "The Finkler Question" was shortlisted today for the Man Booker Prize.  Jacobson, one of Britain's most respected and funniest writers, did an interview with me a couple of weeks ago.

The Man Booker Question: "The Finkler Question"?

As a general rule, I don't cheerlead for people I've written about.  But I'll allow myself this: hats off, again, to Howard Jacobson, whose novel "The Finkler Question" was shortlisted today for the Man Booker Prize.  Jacobson, one of Britain's most respected and funniest writers, did an interview with me a couple of weeks ago.

The Man Booker Question: "The Finkler Question"?

As a general rule, I don't cheerlead for people I've written about.  But I'll allow myself this: hats off, again, to Howard Jacobson, whose novel "The Finkler Question" was shortlisted today for the Man Booker Prize.  Jacobson, one of Britain's most respected and funniest writers, did an interview with me a couple of weeks ago.

The Man Booker Prize and Howard Jacobson, the British Philip Roth

Hats off to Howard Jacobson, often dubbed "the British Philip Roth," who was long-listed yesterday for the Man Booker Prize in Fiction.  While his book, "The Finkler Question," a comic novel about three single Jewish intellectuals, has not been released in the States yet, it's already made a big splash in the UK.  It's reception is worth noting too, in light of the recent uptick in concern over British anti-Semitism.

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