Tim Boxer

10/25/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

At the Appeal of Conscience Foundation’s 45th anniversary awards dinner last month, the chairman/CEO of Coca-Cola, Muhtar Kent, was delighted to find himself seated next to Bernard Arnault, chairman/CEO of the Paris-based LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton.

“Our two companies,” Kent said, “have a passion for bubbles — Coca-Cola and Dom Perignon.”

“That comparison smells of high treason!” exclaimed Arnault.

10/17/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

Harvey Weinstein, who produces thought provoking films, called Rupert Murdoch a great innovator for taking the Wall Street Journal in an age when all newspaper circulation has been spiraling downward and making it “the greatest newspaper in the nation.”

When Murdoch visited the paper the first day, Weinstein said, every employee was polite and quiet. “Is this a newsroom?” the new boss asked. “Looks more like a morgue.”

“Boy, has he changed that!” Weinstein said.

10/04/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

Tony Curtis, one of the last of the great Hollywood stars, was also one of those legendary celebrities who rediscovered Jewish roots and decided to give back.

Born Bernard Herschel Schwartz in the Bronx, Tony grew up with immigrant Hungarian parents, Helen Klein and Emanuel Schwartz who was a tailor in Manhattan. Tony had Hungarian on his tongue until he went to public school.

09/26/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

Every woman Eddie Fisher loved was non-Jewish, including such raving beauties as Ann-Margret, Angie Dickinson, Kim Novak, Judy Garland, Juliet Prowse and Mia Farrow among others. Every woman he married (five times) was non-Jewish except, of course, Elizabeth Taylor who converted at Temple Israel in Los Angeles before he married her.

The heartthrob of the ‘50s started out as a ten-year-old singer in his Philadelphia hometown. On the High Holidays He made $20 as the soloist with the tall white yarmulke.

09/02/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

At its annual dinner Gift of Life brings bone marrow recipients to meet their donors for the first time. You know it’s going to be an emotional moment when you see tissue boxes on every table.

Lillian Baharestani, 27, wanted to be a donor. She was raised in Queens where her father taught her to always help others. So at Syracuse University she organized a drive for swabs for the Gift of Life registry. As it turned out, her own swab saved a life.

08/13/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

School days can be stressful enough. In Iran it is a challenging experience in more ways than usual for a Jewish teenager.

At a recent ISEF luncheon at Sotheby’s in New York, to raise scholarship funds for needy students in Israel, Roya Hakakian recounted growing up in Iran after the 1979 revolution.

For a Christian, Jew or Zoroastrian there was constant pressure at school to convert. Roya could not evade such pressure, even though she went to a Hebrew day school.

One day her class was called to assemble in the basement near the cafeteria.