Tim Boxer

11/08/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

American Jewish World Service (AJWS) marked 25 years of helping poverty stricken people in developing countries. Naturally that called for a dinner last month at the Frederick Rose Hall at Lincoln Center to honor its president, Ruth Messinger.

ABC News anchor Christiane Amanpour called Messinger “a model of global citizenship.” She added, “You are our conscience and you teach us what it means to be a human being.”

11/01/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

To be a Jewish musician is easy, says Matthew Lazar, but to be a Jew and a musician is sometimes difficult

Nevertheless he has overcome many hurdles over the years as he guided the world-renowned coeducational Zamir Chorale as its director and conductor — in an age when modern Orthodox Jewish sensibilities shifted fundamentally to the right.

Zamir Chorale was founded by Stanley Sperber in 1960. He made aliya in 1972 and passed the baton to Lazar.

10/27/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

Playwright Joseph Stein, who died at age 98 on Oct. 24 in Manhattan, was an original member of Minyan of the Stars. The organization encouraged show business personalities to celebrate Jewish holidays and traditions.

One of the first gatherings took place at Stein’s home on Park Avenue. It was Chanukah 1990. Lou Jacobi looked around and exclaimed, “We have show people here, even a scout from MGM. MGM—My Gantze Mishpocha [my whole family]!”

10/25/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

At the Appeal of Conscience Foundation’s 45th anniversary awards dinner last month, the chairman/CEO of Coca-Cola, Muhtar Kent, was delighted to find himself seated next to Bernard Arnault, chairman/CEO of the Paris-based LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton.

“Our two companies,” Kent said, “have a passion for bubbles — Coca-Cola and Dom Perignon.”

“That comparison smells of high treason!” exclaimed Arnault.

10/17/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

Harvey Weinstein, who produces thought provoking films, called Rupert Murdoch a great innovator for taking the Wall Street Journal in an age when all newspaper circulation has been spiraling downward and making it “the greatest newspaper in the nation.”

When Murdoch visited the paper the first day, Weinstein said, every employee was polite and quiet. “Is this a newsroom?” the new boss asked. “Looks more like a morgue.”

“Boy, has he changed that!” Weinstein said.

10/04/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Tim Boxer

Tony Curtis, one of the last of the great Hollywood stars, was also one of those legendary celebrities who rediscovered Jewish roots and decided to give back.

Born Bernard Herschel Schwartz in the Bronx, Tony grew up with immigrant Hungarian parents, Helen Klein and Emanuel Schwartz who was a tailor in Manhattan. Tony had Hungarian on his tongue until he went to public school.