Curried Sweet Potato Latkes

A South Asian twist on the classic Chanukah treat.

12/03/10
Editorial Assistant
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I love the classic potato latke. It might be one of my favorite foods of all time. And as the old saying goes – if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. So I prefer to think of this as a completely different dish, a way to try out new flavors and combinations – after you’ve already had your fill of the traditional potato pancake.

This recipe starts with the sweet potato – the softer, more orange, sweeter variety of the classic spud. Things get even more interesting with the spices – curry, a traditional Indian spice, is a great pair to the sweet vegetable.

It goes without saying, but frying things isn’t really the healthiest way to eat. If you want to skimp on the oil in this recipe, they won’t be as crispy and delicious. But your heart will thank you.

Happy Chanukah!

Curried Sweet Potato Latkes - Makes about 15 medium latkes

1 pound sweet potatoes (about 1 large or 2 medium potatoes)
1/2 cup flour
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon brown sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons curry powder
1 teaspoon salt
sprinkle black pepper
2 eggs
1/3 cup milk or soy milk
Canola oil

Peel the potatoes. On the coarse side of a box grater or in the food processor grate the potatoes. In a separate bowl, mix together the flour, sugars, baking powder, curry, salt and pepper. Add in the eggs, and beat to combine. Stir in the milk until well mixed.

Add in the grated sweet potatoes, and mix until the batter is moistened.

Heat 1/8 to ¼-inch of oil in a heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium heat.

When the oil is hot, place heaping tablespoons of the batter in the pan, press down slightly to form the patty shape. Fry until crispy, 2 to 3 minutes, then flip and fry the other side. Remove from the pan and place on a paper-towel lined plate to drain.

 

If you’re looking for a sweeter Chanukah treat, check out Baking and Mistaking for some doughnut adventures.

Last Update:

12/06/2010 - 12:03

Comments

This is a great receipe

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