Chocolate Almond Biscotti

Master the classic crunchy cookie.

09/15/11

If there is anything that screams "adult cookie" it is the biscotti. But that doesn't mean they can't be delicious. This simple recipe will produce crisp, rich and flavorful cookies that you can enjoy on their own or  dipped in a mug of steaming coffee or tea. The recipe calls for slivered almonds but just about any other nut would work as well - or even some white chocolate chips for a nice contrast.

The name biscotti is derived from the Italian for "twice baked" - which is how this cookie gets its traditional texture. The dough is formed in to a log and baked once, then removed, sliced in to strips and baked a second time, on a much lower temperature, to "dry out" the cookies.The recipe below is given in grams, which is how I learned it as a student at the Jerusalem Culinary Institute. I've given estimations in cups next to it for those of you without scales at home - but weighing ingredients is always the most precise.

Chocolate Almond Biscotti:

156g ( 1 1/4 cups) flour
4g (1 teaspoon) baking soda
25g (a scant 1/4 cup) cocoa powder
130g egg (2-3 large eggs)
120g (1/2 cup) sugar
4g (1 teaspoon) vanilla
pinch of salt
200g (7 ounces) slivered almonds
107g (about 4 ounces) mini chocolate chips

Spread the almonds out on a baking sheet and roast at 350F for about 8 minutes. Let cool.
Mix the flour, baking soda and cocoa powder together in a bowl, set aside.
Whip the eggs and the sugar together for about 8 minutes, until tripled in volume. Add the vanilla and salt and mix.
Fold in the dry ingredients to the egg mix until no streaks of flour remain. Fold in the almonds and chocolate chips.
Shape the dough into a long flat loaf on a piece of parchment paper - about a foot long.
Bake on 350F for 45 minutes. Remove from the oven, and lower to 275F.
Slice the loaf in to approximately 1/2 inch thick cookies, then lay flat on the parchment paper and bake an additional 30 minutes until completely dry.

Last Update:

09/15/2011 - 18:22

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