A Transporting Treat

Savor the end of blueberry season with a dessert that moves easily from kitchen to sukkah.

Online Jewish Week Columnist
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Blueberry season is just coming to an end, so take advantage of this recipe to utilize the last surge of berries in these cute, pop tart-like desserts. Of course, in the United States you can buy berries almost year round, and frozen would work as well here.

The juices of the blueberries have a tendency to ooze out as they cook, even if you seal the edges as best you can: It doesn't really bother me, I kind of like the "rustic" look.

Kids - and adults - will love having their own individual pies to hold in their hand and snack on, and they're much easier for transport as well.

Amy Spiro is a journalist and writer based in Jerusalem. She is a graduate of the Jerusalem Culinary Institute's baking and pastry track, a regular writer for The Jerusalem Post and blogs at bakingandmistaking.com. She also holds a BA in Journalism and Politics from NYU.

Ingredients: 
2 1/2 cups flour
2 tablespoons sugar
pinch of salt
1 cup (2 sticks/225g) butter or margarine, diced and frozen
3 to 5 tablespoons ice water
About 2 cups blueberries, rinsed and patted dry
zest of one lemon
1/4 cup sugar
1 egg
coarse sugar
Recipe Steps: 
In a large bowl or the bowl of a food processor mix the flour, sugar and salt together. Cut in the butter until it resembles fine crumbs. Add in the ice water, one tablespoon at a time, and mix until the dough starts to come together. Divide the dough in half, form each piece in to a flat disk and wrap in plastic wrap. Chill in the fridge overnight or for at least 4 hours.
Mix the blueberries, lemon zest and sugar and let sit for about 20 minutes. Drain any liquid that accumulates, and taste a piece of fruit. If more sugar is desired, add to taste, a tablespoon at a time.
Working with half the dough at a time, roll it out to about 1/4" thick on a well floured surface. Either use a round cutter to create as many circles as possible or slice up into evenly sized rectangles. Fill each with approximately one tablespoon of filling, then use a moist finger to wet the edges of the crust, fold over and press around the pie with a fork to seal. Repeat with the remaining dough, rolling out scraps as necessary.
Place the mini pies on a parchment paper lined baking sheet, and brush each with a lightly beaten egg, then sprinkle with coarse sugar. Cut a small hole with a knife near the bend of the pie. Bake on 375 F for 20 to 30 minutes until golden brown. Let cool.

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