A Rabbi's World

02/06/2009 | | Special to the Jewish Week | A Rabbi's World

Yesterday’s New York Times probably had more of substance about the Shoah on its front page than all the issues combined from the years of 1939-1945.

02/13/2009 | | Special to the Jewish Week | A Rabbi's World

Having experienced the almost palpable sense of exhilaration that was so much a part of the American presidential election just a few months ago, the near universal sense of frustration and despair that haunted voters after the electoral stalemate of the past week in Israel was a rude reminder of the fractured nature of Israel’s political system.

02/20/2009 | | Special to the Jewish Week | A Rabbi's World

Among my friends and colleagues, I am occasionally chided for being a centrist.  I am neither a leftist nor a partisan of the right, and I like to think that being open to the best thinking of all sides to an argument is the surest road to growth and wisdom.

02/27/2009 | | Special to the Jewish Week | A Rabbi's World

On the way into Manhattan earlier this week to teach my seminar in the Rabbinical School of the Jewish Theological Seminary, I had my radio tuned to WCBS, an all-news station.  The ride took about twenty-five minutes, and I don’t think I would be exaggerating if I said that the entire twenty-five minutes on the radio was taken up with bad news and worse news about the economy.  The only thing that bordered on something other than that was a report about Bill Clinton, complaining that President Obama was too focused in his public pronouncements on how bad the economy is.&nbsp

03/06/2009 | | Special to the Jewish Week | A Rabbi's World

In addition to my work as a pulpit rabbi in Forest Hills, I wear a number of different communal hats, none more proudly than that of a vice-president of the Zamir Choral Foundation.

03/13/2009 | | Special to the Jewish Week | A Rabbi's World

Although it is more than a little different now than it was almost thirty years ago when I was ordained, the basic requirement is the same.  All graduating seniors in the Rabbinical School of the Jewish Theological Seminary are required to deliver what is called a “senior sermon,” when they either preach or teach in the presence of their faculty,