families

For Kids With Special Needs Who Crave Structure, Tips For Some Summer Fun

Summer is upon us. Thoughts have turned from desks to lounge chairs, from carpools to lazy afternoons by the pool and from early morning alarms to long evenings spent making s’mores and catching fireflies. It’s typical to believe that all families look forward to things like summer vacation, but assumptions like these can be a challenge. Children with a variety of learning and other disabilities thrive on the structure and routine of the academic year, making summer vacation, with its large stretches of unscheduled time, overwhelming for both children and their parents. Add to this concern about the loss of academic skills acquired throughout the year (commonly referred to as “summer slide”) and these few months might seem daunting.

Summer Family Fun. Getty Images

Take A Deeper Look: Supporting All Families

When a child has a medical problem, when a child is in the hospital, we get it.  As family, friends, and neighbors, we understand the emotional and physical strain on the child and his or her family.

Whether we call, send texts, arrange for meals, run errands, drive carpools, or simply check in to offer support, we know we need to do something. We often feel awkward or guilty if we don’t at least offer to help.

The Steinart family. Courtesy of Michelle Steinhart

The Battle Hymn of the Jewish Mother

01/20/2011 - 19:00
Special to the Jewish Week

How dare she. How dare a mother deny her children playdates, television and even bathroom breaks until they had mastered their musical instruments. What kind of mom-ster does this?

Deborah Grayson Riegel

Mom's Bat Mitzvah

06/19/2008 - 20:00
Editorial Intern

Bonnie Panzok is just trying to catch up with her children.

When Panzok sent her kids to Jewish day school to get the education she never got, she watched as their knowledge grew exponentially and surpassed her own. But now, Panzok, after a crash course in Jewish history and rituals, has soared ahead, filling in the gaps in her own Jewish learning.

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