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Israeli Army Uses Facebook to Catch Female Draft Dodgers

An article in All Facebook, the unofficial Facebook blog, reports that the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) has been using the social networking site to nab female Israelis who claim to be religious enough to be exempted from army service. Apparently, their activity on Facebook tells a different story -- one the army is interested to learn.

Are these women religious enough on Facebook to forgo their army service?

Bar Mitzvah Lessons in Cyberspace

Why shlepp your kid to the synagogue for her bat mitzvah lessons when she can dial in virtually?

A recent article in the New York Times shows how the tech savvy bar mitzvah tutors have taken to the Web to make the process more convenient for them and their students.

What will traditionalists make of Jewish kids getting their bar mitzvah lessons online?

Which Jewish group is the big winner in Facebook activism?

Social media is the new currency of political activism. And which Jewish group has the most in the bank?

No, it's not the AJC or the ADL. Take a look at Facebook for the answer: it's Americans for Peace Now (APN), which currently has 17,039 Facebook users who “like” the pro-peace process organization.

Turning Facebook Profile Pics Purple

 As Facebook has become more popular (500 million people is popular, right?), there have been several status update gimmicks. Some are just to be fun (dopplegangers) and others are funny with a cause (women posting their bra color in support of breast cancer research).

Now, the gay-rights organization GLAAD has come up with the idea of making your Facebook profile pic purple in support of LGBT Youth.

Status Updates & Profile Pics to Support Causes

Synagogues and New Technology

Yoram Samets, of Jvillage Network in Burlington, Vermont, wrote an interesting essay for the eJewishPhilanthropy blog titled "Purposeful and Passionate: Synagogues in the Age of Facebook."

Lazy Bloggers And Mark Zuckerberg's (Gasp!) Non-Jewish Girlfriend

Mea culpa, al chet and all that. Among my other shortcomings, I’ve been one lame blogger lately, posting nary a word for a whole week. And my sole flimsy excuse is the fact that I am, like other Jews, just now emerging from a month-long orgy of holidays.

Admittedly, the more observant Jews – the ones who spend the evening and morning of each yom tov in synagogue while refraining from electricity, driving and hundreds of other offshoots of the 39 melachot – have a better case for using the Jewish holiday excuse. Especially since most (unlike me) work for companies and organizations that remain open on said holidays and who, when not doing the aforementioned malachot-refraining and synagogue-attending, have had to scramble to build a sukkah, do laundry, cook and so forth.

Of Lazy Bloggers And Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg

Mea culpa, al chet and all that. Among my other shortcomings, I’ve been one lame blogger lately, posting nary a word for a whole week.

Technology's Limits - After Tyler Clementi's Death, a Rabbi Warns of Technology without Ethics

The tragic death of Tyler Clementi, the Rutgers University student who took his own life after being filmed having sex with a man, has led some to voice concern over young people's misuse of technology.

Rabbi Andy Bachman, the founder of BrooklynJews, wrote an open letter to young people in the community on his blog. The letter was reposted on the Forward's Web site.

Tyler Clementi

When Technology & Shabbat Collide, Give the Benefit of the Doubt

This past Sunday, the president of New York University issued a mass e-mail apology to students and staff. The day after Yom Kippur might sound like a sensible day for issuing apologies, but the question is whether John Sexton actually needed to make a Mea Culpa.

Going Digital for Repentance

Robin Chotzinoff reflects in the August/September 2010 issue of Hadassah Magazine about how she observed the Aseret Yemei Teshuvah (the ten days of repentance) last year by answering a series of e-mail questions from 10Q. Ben Greeman, who launched the project in 2008 explains that "we tried to let people tap back into tradition, but without feeling like they have to pass an entrance exam."

Repent, Renew & Rejuvenate with Reboot's 10Q this Year
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