Exodus

Disability Language Is A Guidewire

At New Jersey’s Camp Marcella, where many blind children spend a few weeks each summer, I used to sprint down the track, with no fear of veering into trees or other obstacles. I held a rope suspended vertically from a loop on a wire high above, which followed the course of the track. If I began to stray, the rope, zipping along the guidewire, would steer me back onto the track. 

Rabbi Michael Levy

Telling The Story Of Freedom

03/30/2015 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

The Passover table is a place of joy. It takes a lot of work to get there. And when the table is set with ritual food and tableware, it seems like an excellent platform for a great story and conversation to unfold. We’re all ready. We’re equipped with texts that share the majesty and miracles of our ancient days. We powered our way to freedom as an underdog against a large and tyrannical force that sought to destroy us. We know the plot lines all too well. It’s not hard to say, “In every generation a person is obligated to tell the story of the exodus from Egypt…” It seems that sadly and happily, it is always a relevant theme, either for our people or for someone else under the hand of oppression, on the brink of liberation.

Erica Brown

The Exodus from Egypt: A Model for Future Liberations

Each Shabbat from January 10 through January 31, 2015, the Torah portions recited in synagogues recount how God liberated the Israelites from Egyptian slavery. For those who are oppressed, Jews and non-Jews alike, the Exodus recalls the determination of slaves to be free and the compassion of God, the Liberator.

Belief-The First Step Towards Liberation

Before the Exodus, no slave had ever escaped from Egypt. Many Israelite slaves, even as redemption neared, succumbed to despair. An important first step towards liberation is realizing that God is not limited by what we humans may consider "the impossible."

Arab Countries Ban Release Of ‘Exodus: Gods And Kings’

12/28/2014 - 19:00

Several Arab countries banned the release of the film “Exodus: Gods and Kings.”

A Permanent Tear: On The Loss Of A Child

12/07/2014 - 19:00

What does the Torah, our most sacred text, teach us about the traumatic and heart wrenching death: the loss of a child?

V’higa’d’ta L’vinha … Telling the Story Of The Shoah

04/04/2013 - 20:00
Jewish Week Online Columnist

It is an unusual day indeed when The New York Times, not always considered sensitive to the concerns of the Jewish community, publishes a front-page obituary for a rabbi. But the Times did just that a few short weeks ago, when it noted, with appropriate pathos and respect, the death of Rabbi Hershel Schacter, of blessed memory.

Rabbi Gerald Skoknik

Hungary For Judaism

03/05/2012 - 19:00
Jewish Week Online Columnist

The Torah’s words were familiar: “V’asu Li mikdash, v’shachanti b’tocham.” And let them make Me a sanctuary that I may dwell among them. This verse from Exodus 25:8 took on entirely new meaning as I sat, Shabbat morning, in a Reform service in Budapest, Hungary. I just returned from a powerful Rabbinic Mission with 28 other rabbis, sponsored by the Jewish Federations of North America, The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, and the Jewish Agency for Israel.

Rabbi Marci N. Bellows.

Preparing for Passover: Keeping Perspective Amidst the Madness

04/13/2011 - 20:00
Special to the Jewish Week

It is often said that if it were possible to remember pain, no family would have more than one child. And yet, year in and year out, we Jews engage in this annual ritual of completely subverting the normal order of our kitchens, and often our furniture, and willingly subject ourselves to the very arduous task of preparing for Passover.

By the way, it is also often said that if the ancient rabbis ever set foot in their kitchens, such that they were, the laws of Passover would look quite different. But we won't go there…

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik

Enslavement, Redemption, and the Arab World: A Passover Unlike All Others

04/06/2011 - 20:00
Special to the Jewish Week

Each and every year, at precisely this time of year, I find myself struggling with the question of who owns Jewish history.

It sounds like an odd question, I know. In a sense, it is. But what I mean is that there are some chapters of our history that are so imprinted on the broader consciousness of western civilization that it often feels as if we have handed over our historical experience to the rest of the world, to use as it pleases.

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik

Karen, from 'Exodus', Dies A Second Time

Jill Haworth, who played Karen, the young Danish-Jewish blonde girl in 'Exodus,' and who later was the original Sally Bowles in 'Cabaret,' passed away the other day.

You probably haven't seen the trailer for 'Exodus' in a while.

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