European Jewry

Bread Alone is Not Enough

Efforts to get Jewish books to Holocaust survivors in Europe

02/22/2011

In the spring of 1946, Zalman Grinberg and Josef Rosenzaft, representatives of Jewish Holocaust survivors and Displaced Persons (DPs) in the American and British zones of post-World War II Europe, respectively, visited the United States. “Bread alone is not enough,” they poignantly pleaded to American Jews, “Send us poets, writers and singers to show us that Jewish life is not dead.”

Presentation of donation of books to JDC from the National Women’s League of the United Synagogue of America, c. 1945.

Jewish Renaissance In Europe Presents A Surprising Challenge

01/18/2011
Editor and Publisher

‘France is a great place for Jews to live,” the young woman on film was saying. “It’s a challenging environment but a welcoming environment.”

The audience practically gasped on hearing her remarks, which seemed so far removed from their expectations of Jewish life in France.

Gary Rosenblatt

Jewish Innovation Not Confined To U.S.

 Conventional wisdom has it that young American Jews are leading the trend toward innovation in Jewish life through entrepreneurial start-ups. There is also the widespread belief that European Jewry is on its last legs, the victim of an aging and shrinking population, and the rise of anti-Semitism, primarily from Arab Muslim immigrants.

But a survey of new Jewish initiatives in Europe concludes that per capita, young Europeans are even more active than their American counterparts in these social, educational, cultural and historical ventures.

Young European Jews Asserting Identity, Against The Odds

Swedish ‘incubator’ project training young leaders, resisting the notion that Jewish life is dying.

08/18/2010
Editor And Publisher

 Stockholm — When the tall Hungarian woman in the back of the room rose to speak, I could see the passion and flash of anger in her face. She was the first to raise her hand after my talk to 27 young men and women from both Eastern and Western Europe, participants in a 10-day program in the Swedish capital for academics and activists committed to enhancing Jewish life in their native countries.

Gary Rosenblatt
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