Blogs
07/08/2014 | | Travel Writer | Travel
Menemsha Harbor, as seen from the porch of the Galley, a takeout lunch spot. Hilary Larson/JW

‘You’ll never believe this,” I said to my sister over the phone from Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. “They’re selling cocktails in Menemsha!”

“Cocktails in Menemsha? I do not believe you,” she responded. “Have you actually ordered one?”

07/08/2014 | | Staff Writer | Lens
Getty Images

For 40 recent years, half in the last days of communism and half in freedom, the modest two-story, Classical-style synagogue building on Na Potoce Street in Brandys nad Labem, in central Czech Republic, had no signs of Jewish life. The town, which had a Jewish population of 380 in 1893 and nearly 140 in the early 1930s, had no known Jewish residents after the Holocaust; the synagogue was used for a time as a pharmaceuticals warehouse and as a repository of Prague’s Jewish Museum.

07/08/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | First Person
Merri Ukraincik

To the well-trained eye, the dollar store is a potential treasure trove. I have stumbled upon some real gems among the chazarei.  But even I was shocked to discover a cache of coveted Panini soccer albums randomly shelved with the party favors on the eve of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. 

07/08/2014 | | Staff Writer | The JW Q&A
Likud member Ofir Akunis: Given “huge changes in our region,” Israel should be “careful” about peace steps.

Ofir Akunis is the Likud Party’s deputy minister for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and a member of the Knesset. From 2010 until 2012, he served as the Knesset’s deputy speaker. In addition, Akunis, 41, has also served as both chairman and speaker of the Likud Party. He was interviewed last week during a visit here.

07/07/2014 | Matchmaker
Brett and Laurie. Slav Zinger Photography

Chicago-born Brett Baron hadn’t come to the Elevation Seminar to meet girls. He came because of a poster advertising the seminar that he’d seen at his Jerusalem yeshiva, which promised a spiritual experience. But his friend Josh pointed someone out.

07/02/2014 | | Jewish Week Online Columnist | A Rabbi's World
Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik

Countless words have been uttered in an effort to give expression to the grief and revulsion that all of us who love Israel are feeling this week. The cruel and senseless execution of three young teens whose only sin was to be hitchhiking in a tough neighborhood has left us all stunned, and though words have poured out of everyone who can speak or write, none of them have been adequate to the challenge at hand. The pain is too great, and the implications of the event too present in our conscious minds.

07/02/2014 | | Jewish Week Online Columnist | Tim Boxer
Shimon Peres is being feted all over the United States. Here, after receiving the Congressional Medal of Honor. Getty Images

More than 1,100 people packed New York’s Park Avenue Synagogue, the Conservative sanctuary on the Upper East Side, to bid farewell to Shimon Peres. One of the founders of the State of Israel, Peres is concluding a seven-year stint as president of Israel next month. Charlie Rose, host of a PBS interview program and co-anchor of CBS This Morning, engaged in a Q&A session with the 90-year-old statesman, the oldest head of state in the world.

07/01/2014 | | Staff Writer | The JW Q&A
NCJW’s Jody Rabhan

Jody Rabhan became director this week of the Washington operations of the National Council of Jewish Women (NCJW), succeeding Sammie Moshenberg, who retired after 33 years with the organization. Rabhan began her career two decades ago as a graduate fellow at the Baltimore Institute for Jewish Communal Service. She continued as a lobbyist for six years before pausing to start a family. She then worked as a private consultant for Jewish nonprofits, specializing in advocacy and development projects. Two years ago she returned as Moshenberg’s deputy. She and her husband have two sons and live in Bethesda, Md.

07/01/2014 | | Staff Writer | Lens
Getty Images

The Jews of Hungary marked a little-known anniversary recently — the start of the Jewish community’s forced relocation into “Yellow-Star Houses” during the Nazis’ wartime occupation.

07/01/2014 | | Contributing Editor | Table For One
Heather Robinson

In June’s Vanity Fair magazine, Monica Lewinsky, now 40, asks the world to reconsider who she is. In her essay, “Shame and Survival,” she writes about how, since 1998, when the news broke about her affair with former President Bill Clinton, humiliation has been her constant companion. She calls out women who consider themselves feminists, some of whom piled on the public humiliation of a then-24-year-old while, in many cases, giving a pass to the then 52-year-old Clinton for his behavior. In particular, she cites a gathering of the “New York Supergals” — a group of feminists who met to publicly dish about the scandal after it broke.