10/07/2015 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Culture View
George Robinson

Midway through its three-hour running time, there is a scene in Frederick Wiseman’s new documentary, “In Jackson Heights,” in which we see a few minutes of a typical workday in the office of Councilman Daniel Dromm. Two members of Dromm’s staff are fielding irate calls from constituents. We hear only their side of the conversations, so it takes a moment before it becomes clear what very local issue the callers are discussing. But it is impossible to miss the interplay of exasperation, concern and slowly eroding patience in the faces of Dromm’s long-suffering staffers.

10/07/2015 | | Culture Editor | The JW Q&A
MacArthur-winner Marina Rustow: “When they told me, I was in a state of shock.”

Last week, Princeton scholar Marina Rustow was named a recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, more popularly known as a MacArthur “genius” award. The $625,000 prize is a no-strings-attached award, recognizing individuals who are “pushing the boundaries of their fields, improving our world in imaginative, unexpected ways,” as the foundation’s president, Julia Stasch, explains. The Jewish studies specialist is one of 24 writers, artists, scholars and musicians selected.

10/07/2015 | | Lens
Getty Images

Just as the Jews of Israel and Jewish visitors from abroad observe an ancient tradition during Sukkot, the world’s Christians have their own, more modern, Sukkot tradition — marching through the streets of Jerusalem en masse to show their support for the Jewish state.

10/07/2015 | | Travel Writer | Travel
The idyllic harbor in Grenada.  Wikimedia Commons

It’s hurricane season in the Atlantic! That’s plain to anyone suffering through a wet, dreary East Coast fall. With the onset of chilly nights, it’s time to think about a winter escape.

10/01/2015 | | Jewish Week Online Columnist | Matchmaker
The young couple likes to think of themselves as a start-up. Michael Temchine

Tali Brown and Yoni Kozlowski were classmates at the Melvin J. Berman Hebrew Academy, a co-educational Modern Orthodox Jewish Day School in Rockville, MD. They lived in the same neighborhood and both went to the Kemp Mill Synagogue, where their families were friends. 

10/01/2015 | | Jewish Week Online Columnist | A Rabbi's World
Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik

One of my very favorite things about the pulpit rabbinate is that no two days are the same. Unlike the iconic 9-5 job, with well-defined hours and expectations, the rabbinate is more “free-form,” with hours that are, in theory and often in practice, 24/7. You’re always on call, because the kinds of needs that rabbis are expected to meet are not restricted to any one time of day.

09/30/2015 | | Lens
Getty Images

In modern-day Israel, as in the ancient Promised Land, Sukkot is a major pilgrimage festival. In the old days, the Holy Temples in Jerusalem, where various sacrifices were offered, were the core of the pilgrims’ journeys; today, the entire land of Israel celebrates Sukkot.

09/30/2015 | | Travel Writer | Travel
Victorian architecture in downtown Los Gatos, home to one of Silicon Valley’s most established Judaica shops. Wikimedia Commons

Every morning in San Francisco’s trendy Mission District, as artisanal bakeries fire up their ovens and hipster coffee shops pour $6 brews, a quiet army of Dockers-clad engineers climbs aboard buses and heads out of town.

09/24/2015 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Culture View
Ted Merwin

09/24/2015 | | Travel Writer | Travel
Carrer Blai in the Poble Sec neighborhood of Barcelona. Wikimedia Commons

The claustrophobia might peak along the Ramblas, Barcelona’s fabled boulevard, in a shoulder-to-shoulder jostle of tourists and pickpockets. Or it might flare up amid the congested alleys of the Gothic Quarter — alleys that would feel romantic if there were room to breathe.