10/01/2015 | | Jewish Week Online Columnist | Matchmaker
The young couple likes to think of themselves as a start-up. Michael Temchine

Tali Brown and Yoni Kozlowski were classmates at the Melvin J. Berman Hebrew Academy, a co-educational Modern Orthodox Jewish Day School in Rockville, MD. They lived in the same neighborhood and both went to the Kemp Mill Synagogue, where their families were friends. 

10/01/2015 | | Jewish Week Online Columnist | A Rabbi's World
Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik

One of my very favorite things about the pulpit rabbinate is that no two days are the same. Unlike the iconic 9-5 job, with well-defined hours and expectations, the rabbinate is more “free-form,” with hours that are, in theory and often in practice, 24/7. You’re always on call, because the kinds of needs that rabbis are expected to meet are not restricted to any one time of day.

09/30/2015 | | Lens
Getty Images

In modern-day Israel, as in the ancient Promised Land, Sukkot is a major pilgrimage festival. In the old days, the Holy Temples in Jerusalem, where various sacrifices were offered, were the core of the pilgrims’ journeys; today, the entire land of Israel celebrates Sukkot.

09/30/2015 | | Travel Writer | Travel
Victorian architecture in downtown Los Gatos, home to one of Silicon Valley’s most established Judaica shops. Wikimedia Commons

Every morning in San Francisco’s trendy Mission District, as artisanal bakeries fire up their ovens and hipster coffee shops pour $6 brews, a quiet army of Dockers-clad engineers climbs aboard buses and heads out of town.

09/24/2015 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Culture View
Ted Merwin

09/24/2015 | | Travel Writer | Travel
Carrer Blai in the Poble Sec neighborhood of Barcelona. Wikimedia Commons

The claustrophobia might peak along the Ramblas, Barcelona’s fabled boulevard, in a shoulder-to-shoulder jostle of tourists and pickpockets. Or it might flare up amid the congested alleys of the Gothic Quarter — alleys that would feel romantic if there were room to breathe.

09/23/2015 | | JTA | In the Beginning
Jewish merchants come from around the world to buy from Moroccan etrog growers like Mohammed Douch in Assads. Ben Sales/JTA

Assads, Morocco — Why the Jews want etrogs each fall, Mohammed Douch does not entirely understand. What he does know is that Jewish buyers are his main customers.

09/23/2015 | | Staff Writer | Lens
Diane Katz

For his bar mitzvah chesed project, Gidon Katz, an eighth grader at the Windward School in White Plains, recruited 75 family members and friends to help him clean up and repair headstones at Bayside Cemetery in Ozone Park, Queens. (The controversy over the cemetery’s finances and attempts to clean it up have been chronicled in The Jewish Week.)

09/23/2015 | | Staff Writer | In the Beginning
What’s in a holy name? U.N. references Haram al-Sharif, but not Temple Mount, in Security Council resolution. Getty Images

There’s a kind of parlor game in pro-Israel circles, one usually accompanied by a player’s roll of the eyes or knowing sigh: How unfair to Israel can the United Nations be?

09/18/2015 | | Special To the Jewish Week | Culture View
George Robinson

I can tell you from tedious first-hand experience that the Israeli film industry had a long, hard climb to its current exalted stature as a reliable source of intelligent, creative and provocative cinema, winners of golden bears, leopards, palms and other gilded flora and fauna, not to mention numerous Oscar nominations. Recently, though, the new Israeli government has shown a willingness to trade the prestige — and hard currency — provided by these triumphs for an unprecedented and sinister level of control.