Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

01/04/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

 

Beit Shemesh, Israel -- For more than 10 years I have been a board member and supporter – and am currently chair -- of Gesher, an Israeli organization that seeks to build bridges between communities and create dialogue around common Jewish identity. But I would never have believed that my family would find itself in the eye of the storm with physical violence and intimidation on our very doorstep.

01/03/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

The shocking behavior of a small group of haredi militants in Israel has forced me to face the difficult reality of just how much divides the Modern Orthodox Zionist community, of which I am a member, from that of the haredim, despite our sharing of an ancient text. 

01/03/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

A school social worker called me recently. She wanted to ask me a question but asked if she could remain anonymous. She knew that I just published a book on the topic of abuse in the Jewish community and had heard me speak about some of the research I was doing at a professional meeting. What she went on to describe was unfortunately not unique. A student in her school had told her that one of his teachers was touching him inappropriately.

01/03/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Next weekend, many of us will be enjoying a long, holiday break because of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday. We might see this as a time to sleep late, meet friends for brunch, take in a movie or relax on a short family holiday.

12/27/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Within the Jewish communal world, the word “network” is used primarily as a verb. As Jews, it’s ingrained within us from an early age (or so it seems) to schmooze, to kibitz, and to kvetch with one another. To make it sound more productive, we call this networking. Sometimes it advances our personal and organizational goals; more often, it doesn’t.

12/27/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Over the last two decades a host of commissions and task forces have assessed how the Jewish community can reach out to post-bnai mitzvah teens. The bar and bat mitzvah ceremony is an inflection point in the lives of contemporary American Jews and the question that has bedeviled adults has been how to engage teens once they step off the bima at age 12 or 13.