Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

03/26/2014 | | Opinion

You Tell Us We’re The Future, But We’re Also The Present

We are the good, the bad and everything in between. We are our mistakes, our failures and our sins. We are Saturday nights taking selfies with red cups, Monday mornings asleep during first period and Thursday evenings procrastinating on Buzzfeed. We are our addictions to the Internet and our obsessions with Instagram. We spend too much money on Starbucks and too much time on Snapchat. We gossip and we lie. And we would join a revolution for the sweet taste of rebellion. No shame. No regrets. YOLO. We’re teenagers and we’re pretty selfish sometimes.

03/26/2014 | | Opinion

We’re Not Broken,
We’re Something New

Editor’s Note: This article is the grand prizewinner of the most recent Fresh Ink For Teens writing contest. More than 70 contestants from around the country and Israel answered the following question: “What Do You Want Jewish Community Leaders To Know About Teens Today?” Juliet Freudman’s accompanying article was the runner-up. The winner and runner-up received $200 and $180 Amazon gift cards. Fresh Ink For Teens is a Jewish Week-sponsored webzine by and for Jewish teens.

03/25/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

I recently led a periodic outside review of the Young Judaea Year Course, the flagship gap-year non-yeshiva program for American teenagers. I discovered a striking but not surprising anomaly. Although most participants describe this year between high school and college as a “miracle,” “magical,” the best year of my life,” few American Jews bother attending. Only 400 to 600 non-Orthodox American Jews per year choose to spend a year living in Israel after high school. With all the anxiety about Israel’s standing on college campuses and the next generation’s Jewish identity, parents are overlooking an obvious solution to the twin problems.

03/25/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel once wrote, “Faith is a blush in the presence of God.” Put another way, the purpose of a synagogue, or any house of worship for that matter, is to alert congregants of the gap between who we are and who we should be — an awareness that often induces us to blush. The paradox embedded in all synagogues is that at one and the same time they seek to embrace Jews “where they are,” yet also direct them towards “where they ought to be.”   

03/25/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Being a Palestinian Arab citizen in the nation-state of the Jewish people is challenging. Both a sense of justice and of self-interest should lead Israel not to make it any harder for the people who represent some 20 percent of the country’s population.

03/25/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

The importance of the issue of recognition of Israel as a Jewish State by the PLO lies primarily in the refusal of the Palestinian leadership to agree to that recognition.