Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

11/15/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Opinion

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu devoted the bulk of his speech last week in New Orleans to the threat Israel faces as Iran moves toward full nuclear capability. As he spoke, at the General Assembly of the Jewish Federations of North America, I could not help thinking about another speech given by a head of state facing a nuclear threat – that of President Kennedy at his 1961 inauguration.

11/09/2010 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Criticism of Israel, like criticism of any sovereign nation in the world, can be reasonable and legitimate. In recent years, however, discussions about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict have all too often been polluted by those who seek to simplify the conflict into a battle between good and evil and turn public opinion against Israel.

11/09/2010 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Professor Jack Wertheimer’s recent report on Jewish leaders in their 20s and 30s (see “Exploring the Generation Gap Among Jewish Leaders”) is a critical step forward to understanding the fundamental shifts in perspective of a new generation. Yet, as one of those interviewed for the study, I believe two of his conclusions are misplaced, and unnecessarily pit the “older establishment” against the “younger non-establishment.” The reality is much more complex.

11/02/2010 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Iran President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and other Iranian leaders make so many shocking statements that many people focus only on their words. But the real action and cause for concern lie in their deeds: Iran is embarking on an increasingly aggressive campaign of diplomacy that would be replete with irony were it not so dangerous.

Let’s examine Iran’s actions this month alone.

11/02/2010 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Since at least the 1930s, American Jews, like other ethnic minorities, have taken it for granted that a college or university education is necessary for economic success, social advancement and meaningful civic participation. Institutions of higher learning actively compete for Jewish students, and Jews are represented disproportionately among the faculty and as donors and mega-donors.

Several changes threaten this highly successful equation, primarily outlandish costs and out of touch values. Each has a disproportionate impact on Jews.

11/01/2010 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Opinion

Political seasons do not always bring out the best in our political system. The impulse to draw sharp distinctions to win elections exacerbates differences but fails to provide sufficient content to inform voters. When elections are combined with high unemployment, rising foreclosures, and increasing economic desperation, the voices of some become shrill and the voices of the vast majority are weary and often mute. But this year's posturing, acrimony, and ill will seems to have hit a new peak.