Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

10/25/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

On Dec. 17, 1862, General Ulysses S. Grant issued General Order No. 11 expelling “Jews, as a class” from large parts of Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee “within twenty-four hours.” A few weeks later, following protests from Jewish groups, President Lincoln had this order rescinded. When Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise of Cincinnati met with the president on Jan.

10/25/2011 | | Opinion

There is a disturbing new threat to agunot — women unable to obtain a religious divorce. And only those involved in contentious divorces know about it.

10/25/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Editor’s Note: This essay, in the form of a letter, was prompted by the author’s decision to give up his U.S. citizenship so that he could take up a key diplomatic post for Israel in Washington.

Because I love America, it is with hesitant hands and a heavy heart that I am writing these words. I never expected to request revocation of my citizenship, and, while I certainly understand the circumstances requiring me to do so, it is important for me to share with you why I have decided to take this step.

10/25/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

There is a disturbing new threat to agunot — women unable to obtain a religious divorce. And only those involved in contentious divorces know about it.

10/18/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Only a few weeks ago we lived suspended in the High Holy Days. We examined our sins, pleaded for forgiveness and prayed that our loved ones and we would be blessed with health and happiness. We brought little children to hear the shofar’s call and we remembered parents and family members no longer with us. Mindful of our link to the generations before and after our own, vulnerability and mortality absorbed us.

10/18/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

The liberation of Gilad Shalit on the eve of Sukkot, after five cruel years of incarceration, was the outcome of a major conflict between the heart and the mind in which turbulent emotions triumphed. The end of the nightmare created waves of euphoria and relief throughout the nation. Each of us, including those bitterly opposed to the agreement consummated with Hamas, identifies with Shalit not so much as a hero, but as though he were our own son.